1 doctor weighed in:

Hi doctors, regarding to zona riticulars in adrenal cortex , how do these nuclei even produce hormons while they are pyknotic, , ? Giant thank,

1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology

In brief: Sloppy language

I'm glad you're reading closely.
When a pathologists says "pyknotic nucleus", that cells is very dead. Some anatomists use the term more loosely for any cell with a preponderance of heterochromatin even if it's alive. We pathologists can't use any other term and wish all anatomists would say "condensed" for such nuclei instead of "pyknotic" -- it's the term other scientists use.

In brief: Sloppy language

I'm glad you're reading closely.
When a pathologists says "pyknotic nucleus", that cells is very dead. Some anatomists use the term more loosely for any cell with a preponderance of heterochromatin even if it's alive. We pathologists can't use any other term and wish all anatomists would say "condensed" for such nuclei instead of "pyknotic" -- it's the term other scientists use.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Ed Friedlander
This question bugged me, since in fact the nuclei of the zona reticularis aren't even that condensed. I've known anatomists to use the term "pyknotic" for lymphocytes with very clumped chromatin, and for some other inactive nuclei ("condensed" is still the better term.) I look at real tissues from real people. A rare dead cell or two (really pyknotic nuclei) can turn up anywhere that cells are being renewed. Somehow, a "Wikipedia" entry on pyknosis mentioned this in the zona reticularis, and the story's grown to a couple of fanciful descriptions by people who've obviously never looked at the adrenal under the microscope. The occasional pyknotic cells are never conspicuous. Thanks again for your question.
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. William Forsythe
Board Certified,
23 years in practice
171K people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors