Early signs of altzheimer?

Mostly memory loss. Alzheimer's dementia starts earlier than previously thought with declining intellectual capacity and memory. Mild at first it's excused as "absent minded, you're just tired, it's my adhd". The one affected is often in denial of the loss. Eventually newer memory fades & new memory isn't formed. Cognition declines, paranoia & delusions may occur & motor skills(even swallowing) & self care deteriorate.
Alzheimer's stages. Gomto this web site for deep understanding of the stages. http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_stages_of_alzheimers.asp.

Related Questions

What are the early signs of Alzheimer's disease or mci?

Cognitive loss. We now know that mild cogntive impairment(mci) amnestic type is a precursor to ad- about 10-15 % of people will convert form mci to early ad.Both are characterised by memory(especally short term) loss. Dementia is characterised by functional loss as well. If there is a quetion what is going on, a neuropsychological evalaution can help with the diagnosis. Read more...
10 signs. You can get this information at http://www.Alz.Org/national/documents/checklist_10signs.Pdf. Read more...

Great uncle & aunt, and grandmother, all have Alzheimer's or early-signs, could I get it too?

Nature vs nurture. Family history eg genetics increases one's risk for any given condition but that doesn't absolutely guarantee that you'll come down with that condition too. While there are no cures or proven preventive measures, good nutrition & regular physical activity appear to lower one's risk. So does regular mental activity. Check out http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_causes_risk_factors.asp. Read more...

What are some early signs of alzheimer's? I am 55 and am experiencing a lot of forgetfulness. Have been for about 5 years. Seems to be getting worse.

Forgetfulness. We all can forget things specially when we have so much on our plate to deal with . There is certain symptoms for alzheimer's disease , and if u really wants to know see a mental health professional for evaluation. None the less i don't think u do have it .Since people with alzheimer's disease u ask them about their memory and they will tell u"great" even when it is very bad. Read more...
See a psychiatrist. Many people with memory problems do not have alzheimer's. It is a common complaint of people with depression, for example. Chronic stress can also cause memory problems. You need to be examined, don't be afraid to go. Read more...

What are early signs of alzheimer's? My grandfather has been thinking he was in the past. He was diagnosed with oral cancer. Are his symptoms from the cancer, or is it alzheimer's? He has had hallucinations of seeing his deceased siblings, like riding in

Early . Early signs of alzheimer disease include forgetting recently-learned things and difficulty learning new things. These problems can also be combined with something called "executive dysfunction", which means problems organizing, multitasking, coordinating, and planning. With grandparents, these problems often show up as inability to prepare a recipe, a desk full of unopened bills, bounced checks, missed appointments, and missed medications. Hallucinations are not an early sign of alzheimer's disease (well, sort of... Keep reading). In old folks with lots of chronic medical problems and many medications, an acute (new) medical problem, a new medicine, or a change in routine can sometimes cause something called "delirium". Delirium often includes hallucinations. Sometimes the hallucinations are pleasant, but they can also be very distressing. Delirium is very common among the sick elderly, and is an important and sometimes very serious problem that should be brought to the attention of physicians before it gets worse. When a previously-well older person develops delirium, it should increase the level of suspicion for cognitive problems like dementia, which can be hiding under the surface. Read more...
10 signs. You can get this information at http://www.Alz.Org/national/documents/checklist_10signs.Pdf. Read more...

@ age 68 my husband was tested by a neurologist. Result was early signs of a. How can they say it is really alzheimer's and not age relate dementia?

Because... There is no such thing as "age related dementia." the dementias (and there are specific types) are actual illnesses versus mild forgetfulness that doesn't progress and isn't neurodegenerative. There used to be something called "presenile dementia, " which is a term/concept barely in use anymore. The real question is how they know it's alzheimer's, although there are ways to be pretty sure. Read more...
STATISTICS. There is no real "age related dementia", as actually about 45% of americans develop alzheimer's by age 85, but roughly 50% by then have generally normal cognition. Your husband is in the age group of alzheimer's, but could also have stroke related issues or medication induced pseudo-dementia, or even b-12 deficiency. Docs are 90% correct with their clinical diagnoses. Pet scan can confirm. Read more...
Age related Dementia. I agree wit other doctors , there is no age related dementia , there is age related memory deline. Read more...
Pattern of deficits. There is no such thing as age related dementia though age is by far the biggest risk factor for alzheimer's and several other types of dementia. Alzheimer's is the most common type of dementia. Perhaps you were thinking of age related memory loss? To diagnose what type of dementia someone has one looks at which areas of brain functioning are impaired. Read more...

My grandfather is 84 and his doctor said he is showing early signs of Alzheimer's disease. I do have add and anxiety since teens. Does this greatly increase my chance with early Alzheimer's disease?

Probably not. While some cases of alzheimer's are hereditary, most are not. So far, we haven't found any connection between add or anxiety increasing the risk for ad. Exercise and a diet rich in vegetables seems to ward of ad somewhat. Using your brain is important, too. Read, work puzzles or take classes to keep your mind active. Read more...