What is the cure for eczema?

Control, no cure. While eczema cannot be cured, it can be improved and controlled by using gentle skin care, moisturizing at least daily, and taking a medication to prevent itching. You should also find out if you are allergic since avoiding the allergen may significantly improve the eczema as well.
None. Avoid things that make you break out, soaps & wetness. Wash your hands only when necessary. Wear gloves when needed. Wear clothes made of cotton. Bathe only with a small amount of mild unscented soap, such as dove. Keep the water temperature cool or warm, not hot. Use the medicine your doctor gave you. Use a plain moisturizer daily. Avoid scratching or rubbing the itchy area. Manage stress.
See below. Eczema is in the same family of conditions as allergies and asthma. It can't be cured but usually can be controlled. It is best managed by using a sensitive skin cleanser, avoiding bathing in very hot water, and using a sensitive skin lotion at least 3 times daily, even when the rash isn't there. If doing this doesn't help enough, please see your doctor for additional management.

Related Questions

What's the cure for eczema?

No cure but. Regular use of moisturizer to improve the skin's barrier defect, allergen avoidance if indicated, topical steroid, another anti-inflammatory cream (Protopic etc), allergy shots, and/or UVB phototherapy may all be helpful in controlling i or even induce a remission. In children, 70% will enjoy a remission by age 7. In adult, the remission rate is much much lower. Read more...

What are some easy cures for eczema?

Chronic. Eczema is a chronic recurrent skin condition. Treatment can help to control and minimize exacerbation a but does not cure it. In young children it frequently gets better over time. See a doctor for diagnosis and treatment. Read more...

What is the cure of skin eczema?

Eczema. The goal of treatment for eczema is to relieve and prevent itching, which can lead to infection. Since the disease makes skin dry and itchy, lotions and creams are recommended to keep the skin moist. These products are usually applied when the skin is damp, such as after bathing, to help the skin retain moisture. Cold compresses may also be used to relieve itching.Over-the-counter products, such as hydrocortisone 1% cream, or prescription creams and ointments containing corticosteroids, are often prescribed to lessen inflammation. Read more...

What is the best cure for eczema?

Steroids. Depends on the severity of eczema, your physician may prescribe a mild to strong potency topical steroids. Use moisturizer and skin cleansers instead of soap for bathing.Oral antihistamine to help with itching. Read more...
Time. There are no "cures" for eczema, although eczema typically gets better as one gets older. The best treatments for eczema include gentle soaps or non-soap cleansers, good moisturizers (aquaphor), and topical steroid ointments/creams for flare-ups. Read more...
Protect. Avoid things that make you break out, soaps & wetness. Wash your hands only when necessary. Wear gloves when needed. Wear clothes made of cotton. Bathe only with a small amount of mild unscented soap, such as dove. Keep the water temperature cool or warm, not hot. Use the medicine your doctor gave you. Use a plain moisturizer daily. Avoid scratching or rubbing the itchy area. Manage stress. Read more...

What is the longterm cure for eczema in children?

None. Eczema has no " cure"= there are great ways to avoid triggers and treat flares- but as far as taking something or undergoing some treatment to completely be "cured" - none that i know of.. Sorry - - good luck! Read more...
Eczema and you. Eczema is in the same family of conditions as allergies and asthma. It can't be cured but usually can be controlled. It is best managed by using a sensitive skin cleanser, avoiding bathing in very hot water, and using a sensitive skin lotion at least 3 times daily, even when the rash isn't there. If doing this doesn't help enough, please see your doctor for additional management. Read more...

What is the best cure for eczema on and around the eyelids, besides hydrocortisone cream?

Calcineurin Agents. Calcineurin inhibitors are often prescribed as an alternative to topical corticosteroids or when other treatments have failed or lead to unwanted side effects. Unlike topical corticosteroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors do not thin the skin and can be applied to sensitive areas, such as the face and eyelids, where corticosteroids are avoided. Read more...
Allergy? Also helps to use vaseline or aquaphor to help moisturize around the eyes. Need to stop cosmetic or other products being used around the eyes until the rash resolves. Possibly may involve allergic reaction to a cosmetic or eye product. Read more...

What's a good way to cure eczema fast?

Protect. Avoid things that make you break out, soaps & wetness. Wash your hands only when necessary. Wear gloves when needed. Wear clothes made of cotton. Bathe only with a small amount of mild unscented soap, such as dove. Keep the water temperature cool or warm, not hot. Use the medicine your doctor gave you. Use a plain moisturizer daily. Avoid scratching or rubbing the itchy area. Manage stress. Read more...

What's a good way to cure eczema white spots?

Moisturize. Dry, light colored, scaly patches or pityriasis alba is a milder presentation of eczema. Both are primarily a dry skin problem. Basic treatment is to correct the dry skin by using moisturizers and avoiding practices that dry the skin such as bathing in hot water or use of perfumed soaps. You may need additional treatment with steroid creams which would require a visit with your doctor. Read more...

What is a good way to cure eczema?

can treat but not . Eczema can be treated by using moiturusers, steroid creams, or macrolide immune suppressants like Protopic some times combined with anti itch meds, and you can control eczema. Some children and adults get the rash due to allergies to certain foods and you can advice the patients to tay oof these foods as well acute flare ups have to be treated aggressively some times. Read more...
Protect. Avoid things that make you break out, soaps & wetness. Wash your hands only when necessary. Wear gloves when needed. Wear clothes made of cotton. Bathe only with a small amount of mild unscented soap, such as dove. Keep the water temperature cool or warm, not hot. Use the medicine your doctor gave you. Use a plain moisturizer daily. Avoid scratching or rubbing the itchy area. Manage stress. Read more...