Will a kidney transplant recipient be receiving one or two kidneys from a cadaver donor?

Usually 1. Most if the time 1 kidney is transplanted. Occasionally 2 very small (pediatric) kidneys are kept connected to each other and transplanted "e bloc" - they grow quickly. Some older kidneys with low function are transplanted together (but separated) to try to provide enough function in combination. The recipient should understand and give consent (or not) in advance.
One-- almost always. There are exceptions where two kidneys are placed from a deceased donor into a transplant recipient. One is when both kidneys from an infant donor are placed into an adult recipient. Another exception is when both kidneys from an older donor are placed into a recipient-- usually because one kidney would not provide enough function by itself, but both kidneys would provide adequate function.
Number of kidneys. Each person receiving a kidney transplant receives only one kidney a piece from a donor who has died. A cadaver's kidneys go to two separate people in need of them.

Related Questions

Can patient with fsgs and aiha undergo kidney transplant? Whether the patient should go for live donor or cadaver transplant? What r success rate?

Fsgs recurs but, Fsgs is okay to transplant whether live donor or not! however, recurrence, is possible. Fsgs returns in about one third of the transplanted kidneys i.e. Every 3 persons with kidney failure due to fsgs who get transplant, one of them will see fsgs affecting his transplant. The disease may take years to appear however. So, possible recurrence is not a reason to not transplant persons with fsgs. Read more...

Can a live kidney donor who has mersa still be a donor for a kidney transplant?

Sure, once treated. Some people carry the MRSA bugs on their skin/nasal cavities w/o causing problem, so it is not necessarily a problem for donating a kidney if ithe person does not have a problem with active infection. The surgical process is sterile and so it should not be an issue. If the donor is having active infection, it should be treated. Consult doc. Good luck. Read more...

In a living donor kidney transplant, who pays for the operation of the donor?

The Recipient. Donors have no explicit costs associated with donation. All medical bills are the responsibility of the recipient. Read more...
Insurance from recip. The donor should not have any costs. It is illegal to pay for an organ in the US. However, there is a big grant from the government and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons (called NLDAC) to pay for extra costs such as travel, parking, child care. Read more...
The Recipient. The recipient's insurance. It is called an organ acquisition charge. Read more...

What tests do they do on the cadaver kidney befor it is given to a kidney transplant person?

CADAVERIC KIDNEY. The blood tests done on potential donors is extensive. There are no tests done on the actual kidneys themselves. At times there is a cat scan done prior to death that can see a small mass or cyst on them. Read more...
Many things. The kidney itself is carefully inspected to determine the anatomy. The donor undergoes testing for renal function and to screen for diseases that could be transmitted to the recipient such as bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. More important is a careful history of the known diseases, family history, and activities of the donor prior to brain death. Read more...
Deceased donor tests. Most deceased donors will have their blood and urine tests done before they are considered for kidney donation (serum creatinine, urinalysis, urine protein to creatine ratio) Read more...

Post donor kidney transplant, how many days do I have to wait to have sex?

Donor or recipient? Donor will be sore but should be able to have sexual contact after they are released from the hospital (2-5) days for laparoscopic longer for open surgery. Recipient will also be sore and i recommend at least 2 weeks after discharge before having intercourse. Oral and manual stimulation could be performed sooner. Read more...

How successful is the kidney transplant if the donor has a different blood group? Does the graft have chancesof failing early?

Great if compatible. Excellent outcomes occur for kidney donors with different blood groups than their recipients if the pair is compatible (don a-recip ab; don b - recip ab; don o-recip a, b orab). Incompatible paired kidney transplants are subject to antibody based rejection due to the difference in blood types. Prevention with plasmapheresis, use of Rituxan (rituximab) is good not perfect. Yes, early failure can still happen. Read more...
These can work well. Blood group incompatable transplants (for example donor is a, recipient is o) can be done quite well with the addition of plasmapheresis prior to and after the transplant procedure. The main issue is what is called the "antibody titer" in the recipient. If the titer is low enough, a blood group incompatable transplant can be done. Many centers in the us offer this option. Read more...

My sister is in the hospital with kidney failure. Does she need an organ transplant right away? If she can't get a kidney transplant, will she be able to survive with just dialysis until she can get a donor?

The . The short answer is almost certainly "no", although every patient is different, and critical care patients by definition have complex medical stories. Acute kidney injury (or aki, also known as "acute renal failure") is very common in hospitalized patients, and particularly patients in intensive care (although you do not say your sister is actually in intensive care) there are degrees of kidney failure ranging from mild and quickly reversible, to permanent and complete. The kidneys are very sensitive to what is going on around them -- they're sort of the "canary in a coal mine" of our organ systems. So they tend to protest severe illness early by not making enough urine and allowing toxic byproducts to build up in the bloodstream. Fortunately, usually hospital acquired acute kidney failure goes away with minimal intervention. When it doesn't, the function of the kidneys can often (depending on the other medical circumstances) be replaced with a machine which removes the things the kidneys usually remove from the blood(dialysis). Dialysis isn't a perfect replacement for functioning kidneys by any means, but it's good enough for the short term, and many people live for decades on dialysis. Not every patient can benefit from dialysis -- the choice of whether to initiate dialysis is made on an individual basis. Kidney transplant is usually only made available to patients who have complete and permanent kidney failure, are dialysis dependent, and are doing very well otherwise. I hope you have found this helpful, and that your sister feels better soon. Read more...
No and yes. Kidney failure is often reversible. If not, renal replacement therapy (dialysis or transplantation) is required. Dialysis allows the patient to survive without a kidney and can be done immediately. Transplantation leads to better quality of life and long-term survival, but it requires a donor, either brain-dead or living. So often dialysis is required first before transplantation. Read more...
Dialysis - stabilize. Kidney transplantation is not done urgently because of the availability of dialysis to achieve stability. This provides the opportunity for cautious education of the recipient +evaluation of all transplant related issues. A possible living donor also needs education and evaluation, and the time to carefully consider options. If no live donor is available, the wait time for a kidney is years. Read more...