What are some symptoms of early skin cancer?

ABCD's for melanoma. Melanomas are screened by the abcd's: a-asymmetry; b-irregular borders; c-different colors; d-diameter >6mm (size of pencil eraser). If you notice a mole with these characteristics, get it checked out asap. If you have a skin lesion which is growing, ulcerating, bleeding, or otherwise changing, get it seen as well for evaluation and possible biopsy. Best wishes.
ABCD's. Remember your abcd's when thinking of melanoma. Look for moles with asymmetry boarders that are irregular color differences within the same mole diameter greater than 6mm also any new mole or old that starts to itch, bleed or ulcerate should be of concern. Another rule is the ugly duckling rule. Which refers to a mole that looks distantly different from the others on your body.
Skin cancer. Suspect it when a red or scaly spot doesn't go away you don't always have to see the dermatologist and if it is an actinic keratosis and sometimes with basal cell skin cancer, it's worth a trial of Aldara (imiquimod) cream.

Related Questions

What are early symptoms of skin cancer?

Depends. Early skin cancer or pre-cancerous lesions are usually detected by a lesion on the skin that doesn't improve over time. Some lesions can be scaly, ulcerated, or change in appearance to make a healthcare professional become suspicious that a skin cancer is present. Melanoma is a pigmented lesion that changes in size, has border irregularity, or has lymph node involvement. See your physician.
Many symptoms. Depends on the type of skin cancer: basal cell, squamous cell, melanoma, dermatofibrisarcoma, etc. They may look like a pimple, mole, ulcer, scar, nodule, plaque, rash, pigmented, colored, etc. Appearance as well as behavior and history and location are important pieces of information that contribute to the assessment. They may be asymptomatic, bleed, itch, peel, grow, drain, invade, spread, . ..
ABCD's. Remember your abcd's when thinking of melanoma. Look for moles with asymmetry boarders that are irregular color differences within the same mole diameter greater than 6mm also any new mole or old that starts to itch, bleed or ulcerate should be of concern. Another rule is the ugly duckling rule. Which refers to a mole that looks distantly different from the others on your body.

What are the symptoms of skin cancer?

Mole check for's. Aad malignant melanoma: asymmetry: 1 half is unlike the other. Border: irregular, scalloped or poorly defined. Color: varied with shades of tan, brown or black; or white, red or blue. Diameter: > 6 mm. Evolving: mole /skin lesion looks different from the rest or is changing in size, shape or color. An irregular mole that itches, bleeds or is painful is worrisome for possible cancer.
Skin cancer. Skin cancer signs may include a spot or bump that is changing size, color, or shape. Also an area that does not heal may represent a skin cancer. See a dermatologist for any suspicious areas and a routine skin exam.
The symptoms of Skin cancer include: Plaque, Scaly lesions.

What are they symptoms of skin cancer?

New & different. Anything that is growing rapidly, itching, bleeding, and/or changing color could be a skin cancer. If you are concerned, see a dermatologist.
New & different. Anything that is growing rapidly, itching, bleeding, and/or changing color could be a skin cancer. If you are concerned, see a dermatologist.
New & different. Anything that is growing rapidly, itching, bleeding, and/or changing color could be a skin cancer. If you are concerned, see a dermatologist.

Which are the symptoms of skin cancer?

Changes. Changes in size, shape and thickness associated with bleeding from existing or recent lesions. Please have the lesion evaluated by a specialist for biopsy.
Info. Examine all lesions for the abcde's of skin cancer: a (asymmetry) one half is not like the other half), b (border) irregular, poorly defined or scalloped border, c (color) multiple colors of tan, brown, dark black, red, white, or blue, d (diameter) greater than 6mm or a pencil eraser, e (evolving) changing in size, shape, or color, or bleeding.

What can I do to detect skin cancer early?

Routine skin checks. Routine physician and self skin/mole checks will help detect skin cancers early. The following site from the american academy of dermatology informs you how this is done. Http://www. Aad. Org/skin-conditions/skin-cancer-detection/about-skin-self-exams/how-to-examine-your-skin.
Look in mirror. Examine your skin regularly. Look for spots which are changing in size or color. Also look for spots bleeding or ulcerating. If you see any, make sure to get them checked out. If you have a strong family history of skin cancer, see a dermatologist early.
Examine all over. It is important for you to examine your entire body as skin cancer can occur anywhere, not only on areas exposed to the sun. You should be familiar with your birthmarks, blemishes, and moles so you know what they look like and can spot changes. As you examine your skin, look for changes in the size, color, shape, or texture. If you see anything concerning, see a dermatologist!
ABCD's. Remember your abcd's when thinking of melanoma. Look for moles with asymmetry boarders that are irregular color differences within the same mole diameter greater than 6mm also any new mole or old that starts to itch, bleed or ulcerate should be of concern. Another rule is the ugly duckling rule. Which refers to a mole that looks distantly different from the others on your body.

What are the main symptoms of skin cancer?

Enlarging lumps. Skin cancers usually are relatively asymptomatic until they get large. They are more common in sun exposed/damaged areas. Look for lesions on your skin which are progressively enlarging and/or changing. Skin cancers can sometimes, itch, bleed, ulcerate or cause pain. If in doubt, have a md look at the areas in question.
Many symptoms. Depends on the type of skin cancer: basal cell, squamous cell, melanoma, dermatofibrisarcoma, etc. They may look like a pimple, mole, ulcer, scar, nodule, plaque, rash, pigmented, colored, etc. Appearance as well as behavior and history and location are important pieces of information that contribute to the assessment. They may be asymptomatic, bleed, itch, peel, grow, drain, invade, spread, . ..
ABCD's. Remember your abcd's when thinking of melanoma. Look for moles with asymmetry boarders that are irregular color differences within the same mole diameter greater than 6mm also any new mole or old that starts to itch, bleed or ulcerate should be of concern. Another rule is the ugly duckling rule. Which refers to a mole that looks distantly different from the others on your body.

How do I know if I have symptoms of skin cancer?

Skin cancer. Skin cancer signs may include a spot or bump that is changing size, color, or shape. Also an area that does not heal may represent a skin cancer. A skin cancer may or may not itch, bleed, or become tender. See a dermatologist for any suspicious areas and a routine skin exam.
ABCDE's. Examine all lesions for the abcde's of skin cancer: a (asymmetry) one half is not like the other half), b (border) irregular, poorly defined or scalloped border, c (color) multiple colors of tan, brown, dark black, red, white, or blue, d (diameter) greater than 6mm or a pencil eraser, e (evolving) changing in size, shape, or color, or bleeding.

Please explain what are some symptoms for skin cancer?

Often none. Changes in size, color, irritability, ulceration (non-healing site), shape change are often associated with skin cancer change. Often no symptoms noted, just the changes of appearance. Should seek exam by md if you have such spots or changes. Many times can be intercepted before it becomes fully a cancer (dysplasia). Often in long-term sun exposed areas and history in family.
Info. Examine all lesions for the abcde's of skin cancer: a (asymmetry) one half is not like the other half), b (border) irregular, poorly defined or scalloped border, c (color) multiple colors of tan, brown, dark black, red, white, or blue, d (diameter) greater than 6mm or a pencil eraser, e (evolving) changing in size, shape, or color, or bleeding.