Multiple shoulder dislocations and inherent ligament laxity. Physical therapy for a year, but still sublaxating. Surgery or prolotherapy?

Surgery. I would go with the surgery at this point. Your main concern is lack of stability which drives your pain. Once your shoulders are stable, there will be a lot easier to control pain, which would be the main reason for prolotherapy.
Shoulder Specialist. Surgery varies widely and it is important to pick a surgeon that peforms the procedure you require hundreds of times a year. Learn more here: http://www.Youtube.Com/watch?V=lshmf02fxam and http://www.Theshouldercenter.Com/shoulderpain/2012/shoulder-specialist/surgeryspecialist/.

Related Questions

How effective is shoulder stabilization surgery? I'm a yoga instructor. Multiple dislocations & inherent ligament laxity. What are my odds?

Let me explain. You said yourself (inherent ligaments laxity) so this the tissue we have to work with so the result are variable and some time we have to go for bone block, if the reconstruction failed. Read more...
Depends on Surgeon. Patients with underlying laxity have the best chance at success with a global approach rather than just focusing on one area of the joint. Learn more here: http://www.Theshouldercenter.Com/unstable-shoulder.Htm find a shoulder surgeon comfortable and experienced with global repairs. Read more...

I have shoulder instability, will prolotherapy help in addition to physical therapy?

Therapeutic potentia. Prolotherapy is a viable approach to joint problems when instability and laxity are key presenting findings on physical exam. Read more...
Yes. If you had a traumatic dislocation and you are young, the success of non operative treatment is lower than someone who has instability without injury. Both however, should initially be managed with therapy. Read more...
Unclear . Prolo is a type of treatment that has some strong advocates, but i'm skeptical about its benefits in this situation and many others for which it is offered. The important thing is to understand the 'why' behind your instability and to address that directly. Read more...
Quite possibly. There is a good chance that prolotherapy will help this problem, but if possible find a practitioner who utilizes prolozone, which uses ozone as part of the treatment, which often yields better results with less discomfort. See http://www.Losethebackpain.Com/blog/2010/08/31/where-to-find-prolozone-therapy/. Read more...
Prolotherapy. Can help with shoulder instability but underlying cause and physical therapy should be addressed as well. Read more...