7 doctors weighed in:

My daughter is two years and still eats from the bottle. She hardly eats solid food and she is not loosing weight. What could be the problem?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Andres R Villar
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Get rid of it

Providing your child has not an actual difficulty with texture, chewing or swallowing of solid food;get rid of the bottle(s) and encourage your child to eat solids.
Excess milk intake could lead to anemia, excess juice to increased weight, diarrhea .A bottle constantly in the child's mouth could lead to tooth decay.Expose your baby to the wonderful world of flavors and textures.

In brief: Get rid of it

Providing your child has not an actual difficulty with texture, chewing or swallowing of solid food;get rid of the bottle(s) and encourage your child to eat solids.
Excess milk intake could lead to anemia, excess juice to increased weight, diarrhea .A bottle constantly in the child's mouth could lead to tooth decay.Expose your baby to the wonderful world of flavors and textures.
Dr. Andres R Villar
Dr. Andres R Villar
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Marci Dietrich
If your child does not have med issues with mouth, teeth, etc.--is in good health. Send " the bottles" to little babies. Since she is bigger now, small babies "need" the bottles---this iincludes pacifiers. When she is hungry, she will eat with fingers - toddler spoon and drink from a sippy cup. Make it a positive and reward her for her "gifts".
Dr. Bryan Levey
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: The milk

Children at this age who drink too much milk, whether it's from a bottle or a cup, will have very little hunger and consequently not eat.
They often become iron deficient, then anemic; and this can effect their growth and development. First, no more than 4 servings of milk a day. She'll cry about it, but let her. When she gets hungry enough, she'll eat. Then lose the bottle. See her doctor.

In brief: The milk

Children at this age who drink too much milk, whether it's from a bottle or a cup, will have very little hunger and consequently not eat.
They often become iron deficient, then anemic; and this can effect their growth and development. First, no more than 4 servings of milk a day. She'll cry about it, but let her. When she gets hungry enough, she'll eat. Then lose the bottle. See her doctor.
Dr. Bryan Levey
Dr. Bryan Levey
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1 comment
Dr. Bryan Levey
You're welcome!
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