4 doctors weighed in:
I was diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis. I need a second opinion. One leg lost most sensation and the is weak. Bulging disk as well. Cauda equina?
4 doctors weighed in

Dr. William Walsh
Addiction Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: Possible - but
I am presuming that there is biopsy evidence for the disease; if you have seen a pulmonologist, a neurologist, and/or a rheumatologist i would seek immediate treatment.
Ucla and usc are both nearby hospitals replete with sub specialists.... See one asap; in the meanwhile i would not avoid treatment.

In brief: Possible - but
I am presuming that there is biopsy evidence for the disease; if you have seen a pulmonologist, a neurologist, and/or a rheumatologist i would seek immediate treatment.
Ucla and usc are both nearby hospitals replete with sub specialists.... See one asap; in the meanwhile i would not avoid treatment.
Dr. William Walsh
Dr. William Walsh
Thank
3 comments
Dr. William Walsh
I would presume you would want to pursue treatment then - as this does not sound like the usual quiescent pulmonary sarcoid. I don't know the physician community where you live well, but a university hospital should have a neurologist that specializes in it who can see you... your rheumatologist or pulmonologist should be able to refer you locally. In Utah, Dr. Rose at the University would be it
Dr. William Walsh
This is something that you need to someone in their clinic for, internet level advise (with no exam) is risky. If you notice most of us hedge our answers here as it is nearly impossible to get an accurate diagnosis without seeing the images, the patient, and the pathology in person. Medicine is done best face to face. Again, in Utah I'd have you see Dr. Rose at the U, if you want a referral.
Dr. Estrada Bernard
Neurosurgery
In brief: Correlation
Cauda equina syndrome is a diagnosis based on signs and symptoms of nerve dysfunction of the lumbosacral area.
Compression of the nerve roots can be caused by neurosarcoid masses as well as herniated discs or other entities . These can typically be differentiated by correlating physical ex inaction and imaging studies such as MRI scans.

In brief: Correlation
Cauda equina syndrome is a diagnosis based on signs and symptoms of nerve dysfunction of the lumbosacral area.
Compression of the nerve roots can be caused by neurosarcoid masses as well as herniated discs or other entities . These can typically be differentiated by correlating physical ex inaction and imaging studies such as MRI scans.
Dr. Estrada Bernard
Dr. Estrada Bernard
Thank
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