4 doctors weighed in:
What do you do for an ingrown hair?
4 doctors weighed in

Dr. Jennifer Haley
Dermatology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Exfoliate and warm
First bet is to allow nature to take its course.
If it doesn't naturally come out as the skin turns over, gently exfoliate with microbeads (not nut scrubs, too harsh), then warm in steam or compresses to expand the pore, then gently try to pluck it out with tweezers without scarring surrounding skin. A dermatologist can do this professionally without scars. Also prevent recurrence - laser hair.

In brief: Exfoliate and warm
First bet is to allow nature to take its course.
If it doesn't naturally come out as the skin turns over, gently exfoliate with microbeads (not nut scrubs, too harsh), then warm in steam or compresses to expand the pore, then gently try to pluck it out with tweezers without scarring surrounding skin. A dermatologist can do this professionally without scars. Also prevent recurrence - laser hair.
Dr. Jennifer Haley
Dr. Jennifer Haley
Thank
Dr. Tina Alster
Dermatology
In brief: Laser Hair Removal
Avoid shaving the areas which can irritate the surrounding skin and introduce bacteria into the follicles, thereby worsening the condition.
Do not scrub, but instead, gently clean the skin with an antibacterial soap. Trim the hairs at their bases with scissors. Avoid plucking or squeezing. Laser-assisted hair removal is recommended for severe or extensive cases.

In brief: Laser Hair Removal
Avoid shaving the areas which can irritate the surrounding skin and introduce bacteria into the follicles, thereby worsening the condition.
Do not scrub, but instead, gently clean the skin with an antibacterial soap. Trim the hairs at their bases with scissors. Avoid plucking or squeezing. Laser-assisted hair removal is recommended for severe or extensive cases.
Dr. Tina Alster
Dr. Tina Alster
Thank
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