3 doctors weighed in:

Does omeprazole effect the absorption of calcium, or vitamin d? Or cause any other sideeffects to bone health?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Drewitz
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes...

Omeprazole belongs to a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (ppis) which are a popular treatment of gerd and dyspepsia.
When used long term (10+ years) studies have uncovered an association with increased risk of hip fracture believed to be secondary to bone disease (osteoporosis). One must always weigh the risks and benefits carefully to avoid a therapeutic mis-adventure.

In brief: Yes...

Omeprazole belongs to a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (ppis) which are a popular treatment of gerd and dyspepsia.
When used long term (10+ years) studies have uncovered an association with increased risk of hip fracture believed to be secondary to bone disease (osteoporosis). One must always weigh the risks and benefits carefully to avoid a therapeutic mis-adventure.
Dr. David Drewitz
Dr. David Drewitz
Thank
Dr. Charles Cattano
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Ca++ malabsorption

Calcium malabsorption may occur in diseases that affect the small bowel lining (e.
g. Celiac disease), with bile acid deficiency (due to fatty acid malabsorption), with renal disease, hypoparathyroidism, inborn defects in vitamin d formation or the vitamin d intestinal receptor, with gastric resections, and with chronic acid blocker drug use.

In brief: Ca++ malabsorption

Calcium malabsorption may occur in diseases that affect the small bowel lining (e.
g. Celiac disease), with bile acid deficiency (due to fatty acid malabsorption), with renal disease, hypoparathyroidism, inborn defects in vitamin d formation or the vitamin d intestinal receptor, with gastric resections, and with chronic acid blocker drug use.
Dr. Charles Cattano
Dr. Charles Cattano
Thank
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