15 doctors weighed in:

Could you tell me what are signs of diabetes?

15 doctors weighed in
Dr. Danny Proffitt
Family Medicine
10 doctors agree

In brief: Many

Some are classic but not all are classic.
One typically begins to have the three "p's". Polyuria-excessive urination, polydipsia-excessive thirst and polyphagia-excessive hunger. Weight loss is then present due to the sugar in the blood and filtering of this concentrated sugar in the urine pulling water out of the body. One may itch, have vision changes, feel fatigued and many more.

In brief: Many

Some are classic but not all are classic.
One typically begins to have the three "p's". Polyuria-excessive urination, polydipsia-excessive thirst and polyphagia-excessive hunger. Weight loss is then present due to the sugar in the blood and filtering of this concentrated sugar in the urine pulling water out of the body. One may itch, have vision changes, feel fatigued and many more.
Dr. Danny Proffitt
Dr. Danny Proffitt
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Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine
6 doctors agree

In brief: Many

Signs of diabetes can range from no symptoms except for the elevated blood sugar, to excessive thirst, excessive urination, dry mouth, confusion, feeling "out of sorts, " and others.
Any concern with these symptoms should be checked out by your doctor.

In brief: Many

Signs of diabetes can range from no symptoms except for the elevated blood sugar, to excessive thirst, excessive urination, dry mouth, confusion, feeling "out of sorts, " and others.
Any concern with these symptoms should be checked out by your doctor.
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
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Dr. Kai Philipp Olshausen
Internal Medicine
6 doctors agree

In brief: Possibly none

They can include fatigue, excessive thirst, frequent urination.
However, a lot of times people can be asymptomatic and already be in early stages of diabetes, so checking for it at your physical or other preventative exams is important.

In brief: Possibly none

They can include fatigue, excessive thirst, frequent urination.
However, a lot of times people can be asymptomatic and already be in early stages of diabetes, so checking for it at your physical or other preventative exams is important.
Dr. Kai Philipp Olshausen
Dr. Kai Philipp Olshausen
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Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Preventive Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: UsuallyNoneDecades

Type i often sudden, type ii dm commonly progresses slowly for decades without symptoms, is missed by docs, though artery disease ; other problems also progress more rapidly.
Symptoms finally occur slowly: unusual feelings ; loss of feelings in legs, kidney failure, blindness, combined with sudden loss of blood supply to body (heart attack, stroke, peripheral artery disease); ulcers, gangrene, etc.

In brief: UsuallyNoneDecades

Type i often sudden, type ii dm commonly progresses slowly for decades without symptoms, is missed by docs, though artery disease ; other problems also progress more rapidly.
Symptoms finally occur slowly: unusual feelings ; loss of feelings in legs, kidney failure, blindness, combined with sudden loss of blood supply to body (heart attack, stroke, peripheral artery disease); ulcers, gangrene, etc.
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
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1 comment
Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
The reason for multiple different answers above is symptoms vs Ds. Most people take health for granted until sufficiently gone & are no longer able to compensate; symptoms finally occur & become obvious. Physicians are taught normality (the central +/- SD=96% of any variable is good enough) so medical system largely only focuses on treating advanced disease symptoms & what insurance will pay for.
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