I have progressive supranuclear palsy. My biggest issue is that my eyelids are hard to open (90% of the time). Are there any good solutions for this?

Some to try... Visual problems are common complaints with psp. Sometimes this is due to spasms of the muscles causing the eyes to stay closed. Other times the eyes involuntarily point down or don't line up together. Treatment is difficult, but options for are available to try. See http://www.Pspinformation.Com/disease/psp/psp-eyesight.Shtml.
Lid crutches. Unfortunately this is a very difficult and progressive condition. An unusual but sometimes effective help with the eyelids closing are special glasses made with "lid crutches" that actually mechanically hold the lids open. In my 25 year career I have only seen one pair of these.

Related Questions

Can you tell me about progressive supranuclear palsy getting cured/ better?

Read on. PSP ( Steel Richardson Syndrome) is a progressive degenerative condition in the involuntary movement disorder genre. See a neurologist specialist in this type of illness. There is no cure (as in most conditions!) and the treatment not ideal Your doctor will tell you how to cope with it and will give palliative treatment. Read more...

What are the treatments for progressive supranuclear palsy?

Largely ineffective. Parkinson's meds (eg levodopa) and therapy (physical/ occupational/ speech/ swallow) might help a bit, but their benefits tend to be very limited in psp. Read more...
Good Rx available!! Dopamine meds for physical parkinsonism: Azilect (mao-b selective inhibitor) & sinemet +/- Comtan (stalevo (carbidopa and levodopa and entacapone) is both together). Tailor rx & watch for side effects. Avoid Dopamine agonists (requip xl/mirapex er/neupro)--too side effect prone for psp patients. For dementia: namenda, paired with Exelon patch or aricept. For psychosis: seroquel or clozaril. Remember, response is variable, but worthwhile. Read more...
The right doctor. I believe it is important to be seen by a movement disorders neurologist for this neurodegenerative disease. This is a very difficult disease to treat. A patient may need very high doses of levodopa. Oftentimes issues such as feeding tubes are at the fore. A specialist will have more experience dealing with this rare disease and may have other options (i.e. Clinical trials) available. Read more...

How do you exactly prevent progressive supranuclear palsy?

You cannot. Psp is progressive supranuclear palsy in the group of parkinsonism plus=no response to treatment with Dopamine it is thought to be genetic and cause degeneration and changes in the neurotransmiters in basal ganglia and other locations in brain--less understood compare to parkinson disease. Read more...
Do not know. Although seemingly related to parkinson's disease, and categorized as a "movement disorder", there does not seem to be a lot of information on risk factors or any techniques to prevent or even fully mitigate once it starts. It is incurable and progressive, and a nasty problem. Read more...