21 doctors weighed in:
What is the percent risk of my child catching polio versus the percent risk of my child having a bad reaction to the vaccine?
21 doctors weighed in

Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics
11 doctors agree
In brief: Enough to ponder
An asymptomatic polio carrier can get on a plane in the third world, fly to your state & enter your mall/store/ population & the germ can be in your local for wks & be passed to your kid.
The inactivated polio vaccine has negligable issues & prevents a deadly disease. If we are lucky and can eliminate polio from the world we can stop the shots. Until then accept that the germ can be next door.

In brief: Enough to ponder
An asymptomatic polio carrier can get on a plane in the third world, fly to your state & enter your mall/store/ population & the germ can be in your local for wks & be passed to your kid.
The inactivated polio vaccine has negligable issues & prevents a deadly disease. If we are lucky and can eliminate polio from the world we can stop the shots. Until then accept that the germ can be next door.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
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2 comments
Dr. Bryan Levey
Well said.
Dr. Francine Yep
There are so many tough decisions we make as parents. Sounds like you're being thoughtful and careful. You can find a good summary of risks in US and internationally here: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4215.pdf Hope this helps. Good luck with your decisions.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics
8 doctors agree
In brief: Wait a Minute
In your comment you refer to the combination vaccine pediarix, but you question only the polio component.
If you refer to the 1% statistic and include diptheria, polio, tetanus, pertussis, and hepatitis b diseases in an unimmunized population, your odds are much greater than 1%. So it is safer to immunize.

In brief: Wait a Minute
In your comment you refer to the combination vaccine pediarix, but you question only the polio component.
If you refer to the 1% statistic and include diptheria, polio, tetanus, pertussis, and hepatitis b diseases in an unimmunized population, your odds are much greater than 1%. So it is safer to immunize.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Dr. Mark Diamond
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Dr. Paul Cohen
Family Medicine
5 doctors agree
In brief: Tiny...however...
My take on this is that the risk of an adverse reaction to being immunized against polio is very tiny; the risk of actually contracting the disease is also ver tiny.
..But you don't want to go through the latter. My advice is to discuss the matter with your pediatrician; then make your decision.

In brief: Tiny...however...
My take on this is that the risk of an adverse reaction to being immunized against polio is very tiny; the risk of actually contracting the disease is also ver tiny.
..But you don't want to go through the latter. My advice is to discuss the matter with your pediatrician; then make your decision.
Dr. Paul Cohen
Dr. Paul Cohen
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Dr. Larry Lutwick
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Both are very low
But your child is not living in a bubble and wildtype polio still exists.
The vaccine is quite safe.

In brief: Both are very low
But your child is not living in a bubble and wildtype polio still exists.
The vaccine is quite safe.
Dr. Larry Lutwick
Dr. Larry Lutwick
Thank
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