What kind of doctor can treat post traumatic stress disorder (ptsd)?

PTSD. A psychiatrist if psychotherapy & medications. A psychologist if psychotherapy alone.
An experienced one. The best provider to select is one who is experienced in treating ptsd. Cognitive processing therapy has an excellent track record for ptsd. It is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy. Many psychologists and some other types of therapists are trained in cpt. A psychiatrist may be helpful for psychotropic med. Mgmt. Although trained in cbt, i often prefer an acupuncture approach (7 dragons).
PTSD. A Psychologist expert in treating PTSD should have specialized training. If it is combat trauma make sure the therapist is a-n expert-look for Certified in EMDR therapy. My No More Nightmares training also very effectively resolves nightmares. This training can be done over VTC and produces rapid change.
Psychotherapy/meds. Psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, and physicians assistants an prescribe medications for PTSD. Psychologists, social workers, and occasionally psychiatrists can also offer psychotherapy for PTSD. The most optimal results for alleviation of PTSD symptoms is a combination of medication and psychotherapy.

Related Questions

Is Stockholm syndrome a kind of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

Coping mechanism. Stockholm syndrome is a descriptive term for a pattern of coping with a traumatic situation. The Psychological tendency of a hostage to bond with, identify with, or sympathize with his or her captor. Is it a regression or survival mechanism?People with Stockholm syndrome report similar PTSD sx like insomnia, nightmares, flashbacks, difficulty concentrating, easily startled. Rx is the same as PTSD. Read more...
Stockholm Syndrome. Yes, there will clearly have been exposure to traumatic events that need to be treated by a trauma expert. Strongly recommend an EMDR trained therapist for effective therapy with less distress to the patient. This is a more serious diagnosis so you will want to see someone who has been doing expert trauma work for a while. EMDRIA can provide list of experts close to where you live. Read more...
Probably. I don't know if there's any research on this, but Stockholm syndrome, or identifying with your captors in a hostage situation, is a way of coping with the stress of a traumatic situation. Thus, in that sense, it could be viewed as a response to trauma. It's not really "post" since the situation is ongoing, but sometimes hostage situations go on for long periods and the trauma response is long term. Read more...
Traumatic bonding. Stockholm syndrome is a phenomenon whereby a victim identifies with their aggressor as a way of coping with the trauma of being a victim. While it is not in the DSM or classified as a diagnosis you may see evidence of this in people who have PTSD or other trauma related diagnoses. Read more...
Sympathy. Not really ..it is a state of mind where the person identifies with the captor/aggressor and starts to have good feelings towards him/her to the point that they may side with the captor and defend him/her..some consider it a survival defense mechanism . Read more...
That can be the case. Stockholm Syndrome is not an official DSM diagnosis. It refers to a situation where some one is kidnapped or abducted and ultimately identifies with their captor and takes on their values . After such a situation therapy is usually very helpful. Read more...
Yes it is. Hi Arianna the technical term for this is identification with the aggressor. We may cope with the panic and helpless by wanting to be on the winning side. If you cant beatum, joinum"" You may be familiar with Patty Hearst and the Symbianize Liberation Army. Its a very human reaction. Read more...
The syndrome is when. one is held captive or abducted and sympathizes with, or otherwise has positive feelings for the abductor. It is not a DSM diagnosis, was identified in the 1970’s, and can include battered spouses who defend their abuser. It is often consistent with PTSD from the trauma of being abducted or abused, but the syndrome itself is probably a different phenomenon. Read more...

Is ptsd (post traumatic stress disorder) a type of behavioral disorder or anxiety disorder?

PTSD. Ptsd is an anxiety disorder, but i believe one day it will be classified as a variant of depression. As with any mental disorder, there are behavioral manifestations. Read more...
Great Question. Ptsd falls under the class of anxiety disorders. It is interesting that you asked if it is a behavioral disorder. I treat primarily complex ptsd. My combat ptsd patients have hyper-responsive fight or flight reactions. Irritability, high levels of anger & aggression can be very problematic. Ptsd is a destroyer of marriages & families. Road rage & violence when dissociated are major issues. Read more...
Threat of death. PTSD is a post trauma reaction to being in the situation of impending real or perceived loss of life, or inability to is scape. Examples of this would come from being in combat situations, or severe physical or sexual abuse. There are degrees of PTSD, it is not a matter of either the patient does or does not have it, it's not all or none. Read more...

What are the symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (ptsd)?

PTSD. Ptsd can develop after you've seen or experienced a traumatic event that involved the threat of injury or death. Symptoms include reliving the event through flashbacks, repeated nightmares & memories of event, etc; avoidance or emotional numbing, feeling detached, having no interest in usual activities; and arousal -- difficulty concentrating, falling/staying asleep, startling, & hypervigilance. Read more...
Sxs. Ptsd has 3 types of sxs. Avoidance of people, places, things, thoughts, emotions or memories that trigger symptoms. Reliving- intrusive memories, flashbacks- just not being able to get it out of your head. Arousal- robust fight or flight reactions, irritability, panic, gut-level visceral reactions. Emotional numbing is the flip side of the hyper-arousal. Ptsd is not a fun disorder. Read more...
Symptom inquiry. The doctor should inquire if the patient has been in a situation where the patient believes loss of life or catastrophic injury was imminent, and with no means of escape. Symptoms from these experiences include, hypervigilance, sleep loss, nightmares, reliving the trauma, social withdrawal, anhedonia, temper outbursts, emotional withdrawal, feelings of unfinished business, and adrenalin seeking. Read more...

Can post traumatic stress disorder ptsd lead to suicide?

Yes - see link. The short answer is yes. A significant number of soldiers returning from war zones have been committing suicide. This has become of a major issue that the gov't is trying to address. http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/ptsd-suicide.asp. Read more...
Yes. A traumatic experience, by definition, temporarily overwhelms a person's ability to cope with it. Ptsd can be extremely distressing and long lasting if not treated properly. Suicide is an act of desperation to stop pain or distress that is unbearable when the person sees no other alternative. It is important to know there are effective ways to treat ptsd. Read more...
Yes. This is of significant concern in the military where suicides have risen in the wake of oif & oef. Post traumatic stress disorder (ptsd) is usually also associated with either depressed mood or clinical depression. Relentless nightmares and insomnia, combined with the exhaustion that results from non-stop hypervigilance heavily taxes one's reserves. Flashbacks can be completely debiltating. Read more...

What is post-traumatic stress disorder/ptsd?

PTSD. Ptsd is a type of anxiety disorder that can develop after seeing or experiencing a traumatic event that involved the threat of injury or death. It can happen in all ages --after natural disasters such as floods, fires, and earthquakes, or other events such as rape, domestic violence, war, terrorism, or other assaults. History of previous trauma may increase likelihood of ptsd after a new event. Read more...
PTSD. Ptsd may occur if one is involved in life threatening or horrific experience (s). It leads to hypervigilance & a constant sense of being unsafe. One goes into fight or flight mode with little provocation & avoids people, places or things that trigger sxs. The trauma replays through dreams, memories, flashbacks & intrussive thoughts/ feelings. Ptsd deeply effects families. It can impact the soul. Read more...
Threat of death . PTSD is a post trauma reaction to being in the situation of impending real or perceived loss of life, or inability to is scape. Examples of this would come from being in combat situations, or severe physical or sexual abuse. There are degrees of PTSD, it is not a matter of either the patient does or does not have it, it's not all or none. Read more...
Symptom Clusters. The diagnosis of PTSD requires four sets of symptom clusters, including intrusion or re-experiencing, avoidance of people, places, and things associated with the trauma, negative alterations in mood or thought, and hyper-arousal. Less commonly, dissociation may occur where feelings of being disconnected from oneself or the sense that that one's surroundings aren't real are experienced. Read more...

I think I have ptsd (post traumatic stress disorder). What should I do?

FaceTheIssuesGetHelp. The term ptsd has become a marketed fad, very real, just not unique to only soldiers having experienced battle, maiming & death; common to anyone having faced experiences which powerfully challenge their previous experiences & beliefs. Humans, as part of freedom, can be extremely violent, mean & cruel, sometimes temporarily “enjoying” a sense of power. Keep your faith! there is more to life! Read more...
Let me explain. Today, there are good treatments available for ptsd. When you have ptsd, dealing with the past can be hard. Instead of telling others how you feel, you may keep your feelings bottled up. But talking with a therapist can help you get better. Find what kind problem you have and then treat it. Read this web site to see more details. http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/treatment-ptsd.asp good luck. Read more...
Avoidance. Avoidance is a hallmark symptom of ptsd. Avoiding intrusive thoughts, memories & emotions. Avoiding triggers. Avoiding people. But the bottom line is that to get well, you can't avoid it. Your first step was inquiring about it. The next step needs to be action. Find a therapist in your area who is experienced in working with ptsd & start addressing it. Be well. Read more...
Symptom inquiry. The doctor should inquire if the patient has been in a situation where the patient believes loss of life or catastrophic injury was imminent, and with no means of escape. Symptoms from these experiences include, hypervigilance, sleep loss, nightmares, reliving the trauma, social withdrawal, anhedonia, temper outbursts, emotional withdrawal, feelings of unfinished business, and adrenalin seeking. Read more...

Can ptsd (post traumatic stress disorder) be caused by someone close to you being imprisoned?

That depends. That depends. Ptsd most often is caused by involvement in one or more life-threatening or horrific events. However, there is a subset that we can see of care-givers who are deeply effected by their association with traumatized patients. So, depending on the situation, it may be possible. Read more...