10 doctors weighed in:

I think I have ptsd (post traumatic stress disorder). What should I do?

10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
Orthopedic Surgery
5 doctors agree

In brief: Let me explain

Today, there are good treatments available for ptsd.
When you have ptsd, dealing with the past can be hard. Instead of telling others how you feel, you may keep your feelings bottled up. But talking with a therapist can help you get better. Find what kind problem you have and then treat it. Read this web site to see more details. http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/treatment-ptsd.asp good luck.

In brief: Let me explain

Today, there are good treatments available for ptsd.
When you have ptsd, dealing with the past can be hard. Instead of telling others how you feel, you may keep your feelings bottled up. But talking with a therapist can help you get better. Find what kind problem you have and then treat it. Read this web site to see more details. http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/treatment-ptsd.asp good luck.
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Milton Alvis, jr
What Dr. Haded added is an example of what I meant by and summarized in the phrase: Get Help! Please read the following overview very slowly & carefully. If we each knew how to solve our own problems (especially difficult ones based on both multiple previous experiences combined with ongoing current experiences, some seemingly deja vu movie replays in our minds; though sometimes misreading, inaccurately interpreting and inappropriately reacting, especially with anger-over-compassion toward ourselves and others) then we would likely already have done so: i.e. Solved our own problems. Doing what I just described is a tall order, for every human; though we can get better with practice & help. Therefor, getting help means: getting help from someone whom we trust, trust even more than we feel we can trust ourselves. Someone who has the skills, will spend the time and actually be extremely effective in helping us sort out what in going on (some of it hidden) inside our own complex minds. Our minds/brains are designed to remember and continuously store information, compiling, integrating new information into previous information. We are also quite capable of, and do, distort previously stored information so as to be consistent with what we currently believe, in retrospect, to be more accurate. This integration process is great and usually works well. However, it is the same reason that memory e.g. eyewitness testimony, is not perfectly reliable, especially over longer periods of time. However, sometimes, we also integrate feelings and interpretations which are inaccurate or misdirected, drive a sense of aloneness, helplessness, anger, paranoia, grief, etc. along with many other negative feelings. These in turn can drive destructive views and violent actions, expressed within ourselves and toward others. In not so small a nutshell, this is PTSD, along with many other common human difficulties. In searching for help, avoid narrowness of usual thinking/options. You may find the best person within a friend, a Pastor, physician, psychiatrist, counselor, psychologist, etc., or commonly, a complex combination of many others. The key is to focus on those who have (a) earned your trust by their actions and accuracy, (b) demonstrated their ability to understand you and your feelings, (c) demonstrated their ability to help you sort more accurate understandings of reality which meet any and all tests, and, bottom line, demonstrate their effectiveness in helping you be more successful, tolerant and happy in both your current and future life with greater freedom and empowerment.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry
3 doctors agree

In brief: Avoidance

Avoidance is a hallmark symptom of ptsd.
Avoiding intrusive thoughts, memories & emotions. Avoiding triggers. Avoiding people. But the bottom line is that to get well, you can't avoid it. Your first step was inquiring about it. The next step needs to be action. Find a therapist in your area who is experienced in working with ptsd & start addressing it. Be well.

In brief: Avoidance

Avoidance is a hallmark symptom of ptsd.
Avoiding intrusive thoughts, memories & emotions. Avoiding triggers. Avoiding people. But the bottom line is that to get well, you can't avoid it. Your first step was inquiring about it. The next step needs to be action. Find a therapist in your area who is experienced in working with ptsd & start addressing it. Be well.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Thank
Dr. Milton Alvis, jr
Preventive Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: FaceTheIssuesGetHelp

The term ptsd has become a marketed fad, very real, just not unique to only soldiers having experienced battle, maiming & death; common to anyone having faced experiences which powerfully challenge their previous experiences & beliefs.
Humans, as part of freedom, can be extremely violent, mean & cruel, sometimes temporarily “enjoying” a sense of power. Keep your faith! there is more to life!

In brief: FaceTheIssuesGetHelp

The term ptsd has become a marketed fad, very real, just not unique to only soldiers having experienced battle, maiming & death; common to anyone having faced experiences which powerfully challenge their previous experiences & beliefs.
Humans, as part of freedom, can be extremely violent, mean & cruel, sometimes temporarily “enjoying” a sense of power. Keep your faith! there is more to life!
Dr. Milton Alvis, jr
Dr. Milton Alvis, jr
Thank
Dr. Andrew Berry
Clinical Psychology

In brief: Symptom inquiry

The doctor should inquire if the patient has been in a situation where the patient believes loss of life or catastrophic injury was imminent, and with no means of escape.
Symptoms from these experiences include, hypervigilance, sleep loss, nightmares, reliving the trauma, social withdrawal, anhedonia, temper outbursts, emotional withdrawal, feelings of unfinished business, and adrenalin seeking.

In brief: Symptom inquiry

The doctor should inquire if the patient has been in a situation where the patient believes loss of life or catastrophic injury was imminent, and with no means of escape.
Symptoms from these experiences include, hypervigilance, sleep loss, nightmares, reliving the trauma, social withdrawal, anhedonia, temper outbursts, emotional withdrawal, feelings of unfinished business, and adrenalin seeking.
Dr. Andrew Berry
Dr. Andrew Berry
Thank
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