How long should I do physical therapy if I tore my acl?

Depends on surgeon. Every orthopaedic surgeon has a slightly different rehabilitation protocol after acl injury or surgery. Physical therapy is an important tool to use to help you recovery from your injury. Therapy can last from 2-12 weeks depending on the individual and the severity of the injury.

Related Questions

Age 46. Tore ACL in 8/2013. Was given physical therapy for 2 months. Knee gave out (2x) in 11/2013. Work with middle school students. Please advise.

Consider recon. If your knee can't not be stabilized with physical therapy and an acl brace, then it's worth considering acl reconstruction. An allograft (cadaver) is more typically used in middle-aged individuals who knee an "new" acl in order to provide long-term knee stability. If you continue to have instability episodes, then you are at risk for meniscal tears and possibly earlier or more advanced arthritis. Read more...
See details. Speak with the orthopedist who performed the surgery. He/she is in the best position to prove an explanation. Read more...

How long will I have physical therapy after an acl/meniscus surgery?

One to three months. If you are returning to normal activity, one to three months should be adequate. If you are returning to sporting activities like skiing, basketball, etc. Then more therapy would be needed to fully benefit from the strengthening exercises. Read more...
3 to 4 months. After having your acl reconstructed, with or without a meniscus procedure, a patient is typically in pt for 3-4 months and then an independant program working on strength, agility and sports ability for another 3-4 months. Full return to sports in most cases is 6 to 9 months. Read more...

How long after ACL knee surgery do I need physical therapy?

About 3 months. Most patients require around 3 months of therapy to recover from this surgery. The first month is focused on regaining range of motion and gait training, followed by a program of hamstring and quadriceps strengthening. By 3 months, most patients can do a home program to continue to strengthen their knees or more sport specific rehabiliation. Read more...
Depends. That depends on your doctor's preference. Most surgeons recommend starting home exercises soon after surgery, and typically physical therapy begins within the first two weeks and can last for 3-6 months after surgery. Read more...

What are the stages of physical therapy for an acl?

Ask the expert... Each patient's therapy is completely individualized so it is difficult to comment on this; best to ask the physical therapist for the best course of treatment for you! Read more...
Breakdown. First we worry about getting your motion back. Next we concentrate on building your base strength including your core. Next we start working on functional strength. The next stage is functionality and proprioception and finally endurance and sports specific activities. Read more...

What kind and duration of physical therapy is for ACL reconstruction?

Roughly 6 months. This is not my strong suite, as i work with children exclusively. But it is important to rehabilitate under the direct supervision of a skilled physical therapist. Typically the rehab is most intense in the first 6 weeks focused on restoring range of motion. Home exercise program is essential as well. Then several weeks of return to function and eventually sport. Read more...
Variable. Physical therapy for acl reconstruction is quite variable and every surgeon has his/her own protocol. Mine is more flexible. As long as you are meeting milestones of range of motion, and increasing quadriceps strength over the first six weeks, i don't required physical therapy. Between 3-4 months after surgery, work is based as much core strengthening as knee. The last step is proprioception. Read more...

Is physical therapy necessary before ACL surgery?

Goal: normal motion. Prior to ACL reconstructive surgery, it is advisable to have a knee that is "ready for surgery". Ideally this means the initial swelling and stiffness have resolved, quadriceps (thigh muscle) strength has returned, and most importantly- full knee motion is regained. Maximization of these three variables preoperatively help limit the morbidity of surgery. Physical therapy can help this process. Read more...
No. In some cases it can be quite helpful, but with most acute injuries it is not needed. Read more...