11 doctors weighed in:

How to deal with wrist injury for tennis ?

11 doctors weighed in
David Miller
Family Medicine
6 doctors agree

In brief: RICE

A good treatment for many musculoskeletal injuries is the rice protocol: rest, immobilize, cold, elevate.
Don't use it, keep it still (splints help this), ice it and keep it elevated. If it doesn't get better, it's better to take a wrist injury to the doctor sooner rather than later to prevent complications. There are lots of ways to fracture a wrist that might not be apparent without an exam.

In brief: RICE

A good treatment for many musculoskeletal injuries is the rice protocol: rest, immobilize, cold, elevate.
Don't use it, keep it still (splints help this), ice it and keep it elevated. If it doesn't get better, it's better to take a wrist injury to the doctor sooner rather than later to prevent complications. There are lots of ways to fracture a wrist that might not be apparent without an exam.
David Miller
David Miller
Answer assisted by David Miller, Medical Student
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Dr. Pavel Conovalciuc
Family Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: Splint

Get a wrist support, wrap it if it is swollen, place ice on it, elevate it.
If the pain doesn't go away in the next week, see your doctor, it may be that you have a fracture. An xray may be needed.

In brief: Splint

Get a wrist support, wrap it if it is swollen, place ice on it, elevate it.
If the pain doesn't go away in the next week, see your doctor, it may be that you have a fracture. An xray may be needed.
Dr. Pavel Conovalciuc
Dr. Pavel Conovalciuc
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Dr. Raymond Raven
Surgery - Hand Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: Need an evaluation

Wirst injuries associated with tennis can be difficult to diagnosis.
Simple sprains can be treated with rest, ice and nsaids with early return to sport. Complex injuries, such as tfcc tears and rupture of the extensor retinaculum may require surgery. See a board certified hand surgeon for an evaluation.

In brief: Need an evaluation

Wirst injuries associated with tennis can be difficult to diagnosis.
Simple sprains can be treated with rest, ice and nsaids with early return to sport. Complex injuries, such as tfcc tears and rupture of the extensor retinaculum may require surgery. See a board certified hand surgeon for an evaluation.
Dr. Raymond Raven
Dr. Raymond Raven
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