18 doctors weighed in:

Which is better for kidney transplant, tacrolimus or sirolimus?

18 doctors weighed in
Dr. Reginald Gohh
Internal Medicine - Nephrology & Dialysis
5 doctors agree

In brief: No correct answer

Immunosuppressants are chosen based on the characteristics of the both the transplant recipient and the donor kidney-- one shoe does not fit all patients.
Both are efficacious in preventing rejection but both are also associated with specific side effects. Having said that, tacrolimus is currently the most commonly used maintenance immunosuppressive drug used in the us.

In brief: No correct answer

Immunosuppressants are chosen based on the characteristics of the both the transplant recipient and the donor kidney-- one shoe does not fit all patients.
Both are efficacious in preventing rejection but both are also associated with specific side effects. Having said that, tacrolimus is currently the most commonly used maintenance immunosuppressive drug used in the us.
Dr. Reginald Gohh
Dr. Reginald Gohh
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1 comment
Dr. Ralph Layman
Tacrolimus can also be toxic to the kidneys.
Dr. Amy Friedman
Surgery - Transplant
5 doctors agree

In brief: Depends on pt/issues

Very different drugs-both effective and tricky to use.
Multiple meds available to prevent rejection, + often used in combination. Each has strengths + benefits. Selection of a regimen is based on a combination of pt factors, organ quality, side effects from meds, cost (better rates for a hospital or an insurance plan or a pharmacy plan), and md preference. Please discuss concerns with md directly.

In brief: Depends on pt/issues

Very different drugs-both effective and tricky to use.
Multiple meds available to prevent rejection, + often used in combination. Each has strengths + benefits. Selection of a regimen is based on a combination of pt factors, organ quality, side effects from meds, cost (better rates for a hospital or an insurance plan or a pharmacy plan), and md preference. Please discuss concerns with md directly.
Dr. Amy Friedman
Dr. Amy Friedman
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Dr. Paul Cohen
Family Medicine
5 doctors agree

In brief: Hard to say...

I am going to reserve "informed "comments for this question; any medication consideration is a personal choice.
..And the decision should be made after discussing the matter with family, and your treatment team(oncologist, nephrologist, primary care provider, etc) after all the facts are reviewed.

In brief: Hard to say...

I am going to reserve "informed "comments for this question; any medication consideration is a personal choice.
..And the decision should be made after discussing the matter with family, and your treatment team(oncologist, nephrologist, primary care provider, etc) after all the facts are reviewed.
Dr. Paul Cohen
Dr. Paul Cohen
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4 doctors agree

In brief: Both have advantages

Immunosuppressive drugs are necessary to prevent rejection of the graft.
Unfortunately, all have side effects which may be affect some patients more than others. Discuss the risks and benefits of your regimen with your transplant specialist.

In brief: Both have advantages

Immunosuppressive drugs are necessary to prevent rejection of the graft.
Unfortunately, all have side effects which may be affect some patients more than others. Discuss the risks and benefits of your regimen with your transplant specialist.
Dr. Stuart Flechner
Dr. Stuart Flechner
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3 doctors agree

In brief: The1 that works 4 U

Tacrolimus is more effective than sirolimus early after transplant but is toxic long-term to the kidney.
Sirolimus has a higher early failure rate but does not seem to cause chronic injury. Choosing the right cocktail of drugs at the right time for the right patient is the main reason long-term clinics exist at transplant centers. It takes a combination of science, art, and skill to be successful.

In brief: The1 that works 4 U

Tacrolimus is more effective than sirolimus early after transplant but is toxic long-term to the kidney.
Sirolimus has a higher early failure rate but does not seem to cause chronic injury. Choosing the right cocktail of drugs at the right time for the right patient is the main reason long-term clinics exist at transplant centers. It takes a combination of science, art, and skill to be successful.
Dr. Barry Browne
Dr. Barry Browne
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