Can methadone treatment cause tooth decay?

Yes. You need to have a very good oral hygiene care as well as periodic visits to your dentist, probably three times or more a year to follow progression of decay , and give you Fluoride treatments to prevent further decay.
Indirectly, yes. If this will be ongoing, you will want to work with your dentist to manage the increased risk of tooth decay. An ounce of prevention is often worth more than the pound of cure ;).
Yes. Methadone is an opioid and this class of drugs will cause a reduction in salive resulting in a dry mouth. Saliva has antibodies which help to fight the bacteria causing decay. If you are keeping your mouth wet by drinking sweetened beverages, particularly sodas, you've got a 2-pronged attack on the teeth. See a dentist for dietary counseling and proper home care routine to alleviate this problem.

Related Questions

What type of treatment should I get for tooth decay?

Varies. Treatment on a tooth for dental decay depends on the severity of the decay in the tooth. Small cavities in teeth due to decay usually require smaller fillings. Larger areas of decay, especially if the decay gets into the nerve of the tooth (pulp) may require crowns, inlays, onlays, root canals or even extractions. It is better to get the decay taken care of early to avoid more extensive tx. Read more...
It depends . . . . . . . On the size and extent of the tooth decay. Based on that, your choices include a filling, a crown, a root canal or extraction. But, without knowing any more details about your tooth decay, I am unable to be anymore specific. Please see a dentist to discuss your options in more detail. Read more...
Tooth decay. It depends on how extensive the decay is. Small to medium cavities would only require a filling. Larger ones may need a crown, even root canal treatment. When the decay is too extensive the tooth will need extraction. Read more...
See a dentist. See a dentist for treatment of tooth decay. Depending on the severity of the decay, the tooth may require a filling, crown or extraction. Read more...

What is the correct treatment for noticeable tooth decay and overlapping/overcrowding teeth?

Treatment. Treatment for tooth decay is to see your dentist and have the tooth repaired. Overlapped and overcrowded teeth can be corrected by orthodontic treatment. Or, depending on the health of the teeth, gums and bite, they may be corrected via crowns and /or veneers. See your dentist for an exam and treatment plan. Read more...
See your dentist. for evaluation, x-rays and treatment options. A tooth decay won't resolve without treatment. Take care. Read more...

I have a tooth decay. During the treatment the dentist sayed that I have very long root and more than usuall. What does she mean?!

Genetics. Root length varies among individuals. Body height and weight do not determine root size. One may be petite yet have long tooth roots. I usually see this trait as favorable. The longer the root the better supported the tooth or teeth. Also, more amenable to treatment if it needs a crown extension for instance. Read more...
Depends on treatment. Your doctor may have just mentioned it in passing but it may have greater implications later on. You may require a specialist to either perform a root canal or remove it at some point in the future as a long root can be very difficult to treat. It is also beneficial in that it requires much more bone loss to be considered unsalvageable. It all depends on how well you take care of your teeth! Read more...
Normal variation. Some people have long roots, some short. Your dentist was commenting on a normal variation. Ask her to show you on your x-ray next time you see her. Read more...
Longer than average. I would guess that this comment was mentioned just in passing. All that it means is that your dentist happened to notice that compared to most comparable teeth in other patients, the roots of your tooth\teeth were longer. It's just an individual variation and better to have longer rather than shorter roots for tooth strength. Short roots can be a problem. Read more...
Dental anatomy. There is an average length of teeth for most people--but just like noses--some teeth can be shaped differently than average. Despite the length of your tooth, the endodontic therapy (root canal) can still be performed usually. Read more...

I have tooth extraction pain and some tooth decay problems. Can you recommend some medications and treatment?

Go back to dentist. If you are still having pain after an extraction, you should return to see the dentist to have this looked at. You can also have the carious teeth examined and come up with a treatment plan to restore you teeth and mouth to a healthy condition. Read more...
See Dentist. Just because a tooth was extracted does not mean that all of your dental problems have been resolved. You need a complete dental evaluation and treatment of all of your problems, including management of the extraction site to replace the missing tooth. Read more...
See a dentist. Your problems cannot be addressed without a visual exam and xrays. See a professional asap. Read more...

My 18 months toddler has a green line near the gums of his front upper tooth. He slept with a bottle for some time can this be tooth decay? Treatment?

It might be. Treatment really depends on exactly what the problem is. To find out, make an appointment with a pediatric dentist. This needs to be addressed. Read more...
See dentist. It is well known that bottle-feeding during sleep can cause teeth problem . Consult a dentist. Read more...
Oh, my. this can be dangerous, may affect baby and underlying permanent teeth, and can travel through blood stream to damage other organs. Probably is decay from milk sugars being converted by bacteria (baby teeth need to be cleaned) into acids...baby bottle syndrome. 1st dental appointment should correspond with 1st b'day. Please call a Pediatric Dental Specialist (as opposed to GP) IMMEDIATELY. Read more...

Hello doctors. Ihave tooth decay. The dentist sayed that I need tooth canal treatment or nerve cut. Could u explain it?!

Treatment. When decay is advanced, it can affect the nerve of the tooth, requiring root canal therapy. This consists of removing the nerve tissue and blood supply from the root and sealing the tooth from the blood supply in order to prevent tooth removal. Usually quite successful if tooth decay has not progressed to the point where the tooth cannot be restored. Read more...
Root canal. If decay exposes the pulp of the tooth, pain and infection of the pulp(nerve) will result. After decay removal, the pulp needs to be removed to prevent this. Removal of the pulp and a filling in the root space is a root canal. Then the top of the tooth is restored, usually with a crown, sometimes w a filling, depending. Read more...
Root canal. If the decay gets into the middle of the tooth, then it needs to be all cleaned out. A root canal means the nerve is taken out of the tooth and cleaned out and filled. This way you can save your tooth. Read more...
Infection. Tooth decay is infection of the hard tissues of the tooth. If the infection spreads to the nerve chamber of the tooth, and then to the surrounding bone and gum, the tooth may need root canal treatment. The infected nerve is removed and the root canal is filled. This renders the tooth non-vital but sterile, and it can then be filled or capped and will last many years into the future. Read more...
Root canal therapy. Inside of all of our teeth is a bundle of nerve tissues that sometimes becomes irritated, inflamed, or diseased for various reasons. Once it is determined that your nerve tissue will not heal on its own, the dentist drills a hole in the top of the tooth, removes the nerve tissue, rinses with medicine, seals the chamber, fills it with material, and then fills up the hole. Read more...

How do sweet things cause tooth decay?

Bacteria. Tooth decay is caused by bacteria living in your mouth. The bacteria use carbohydrates (sugars) to produce acids which breakdown the surface of the tooth. This breakdown is tooth decay. Keep in mind, it is not how much sweet things you eat but how often you eat them that affect tooth decay. Read more...
Bacteria. Not only sweets but everything we eat causes cavities. What causes cavities are more the frequency of eating and frequency you clean your teeth. Cavities are formed as bacteria in our mouth feed on food left behind and production of acids that softens the tooth structure. Read more...
Sweet things. Are generally sugar rich -- candies, toffees, cakes, sodas, energy drinks, sweet tea ... The more exposure the sugars have with the teeth, the more likely you are to develop cavities. Everything in moderation and maintain good oral hygiene (not the national average of a 28 second toothbriushing) brush at least 2 minutes am and pm, waterpik or floss and see your dds regularly. Read more...