Tooth decay on left lateral incisor. Why?

Out of balance. Tooth decay happens when the acid caused by bacteria overwhelms the mineral structure of the tooth. In other words: the tooth endured more negative hits than it could handle. Teeth are strengthened by good hygiene, good salivary flow, and healthy mineral levels; they are weakened by sugar (which feed bacteria), hygiene insufficiency, or tooth compromise. Talk with your dentist about specifics ;-).
Same old reasons. Tooth decay can occur on any surface of any teeth. The causes are always the same. Lack of care, soda, sweets...
Can be anywhere. Tooth decay can happen anywhere. Decay is caused by bacteria which are naturally occurring in your mouth. When the bacteria are fed sugar, either simple like sweets or complex like bread or sugar, they produce acid which eats into the tooth.
Hygiene and diet. Tooth decay comes from plaque and bacteria (improper/incomplete brushing) and a diet high in carbs and sugars can speed up the process.
Possible anywhere. It is possible for decay to occur on any surface of any tooth. Decay is the result of bacteria in plaque metabolizing sugar in the diet to create acid and subsequent breakdown. Some crowding in that area is not uncommon which may make brushing a bit more difficult. Small chips in that area can also be implicated because they can create food traps which are difficult to keep clean.

Related Questions

16mth old has decalcification marks according to dentist on top-central incisors, can this lead to tooth decay? If so, can I prevent it?

Yes. This would be a question for your dentist. He/she may be able to apply a protective solution. All the best. Read more...
Cause? Can be from putting child to bed with a bottle, from not wiping their baby teeth at least 2x/day, or from developmental abnormality. Decalcification, loss of calcium, means tooth more susceptible to decay. Lots of solutions. Talk to your Dentist, or even better, ask for referral to Pediatric Dental Specialist. Read more...
Fluoride vitamins. Decalcification can lead to decay. Make sure that fluoride supplements via drops are given if the water is not fluoridated and have the area checked to make sure incipient caries is not evident. Read more...
Common Concern. Make sure to brush your teeth with a prescribed fluoridated tooth paste and maintain meticulous oral hygiene to avoid decalcification areas from worsening. Read more...

Can a I use a mouth wash for a bleeding tooth decay?

For what? First, in almost all cases, mouth rinses are not necessary. Secondly, they will do nothing for tooth decay, & not really address the cause of bleeding gums. My recommendation- see a dentist to find out what's wrong and discuss your treatment options. You will need a dentist and treatment, not internet searches and rinses to solve your problem. If I ever find a miracle mouth rinse, I'll let u know. Read more...
Sorry, no. You'll have to seek actual dental care from a dentist. No mouth rinse can substitute. Read more...
See a dentist. for evaluation and diagnosis. If you have tooth decay you may need fillings, crowns or inlays. Using a toothbrush, regular rinsing with an antiseptic mouthwash will help to clean the teeth only. Read more...

My mouth is swelling and doctors said gums infection or inner tooth decay but I don't feel pain on my tooth. What should I do?

Periodontal disease. Since the doctor told you it's infection, what was his recommendations , it's gum problem you should have seen a periodontist, if it's caused by tooth decay , you need to address it , either restore the tooth or if it's not salvageable extract it, follow the dentist a dvice. Read more...
Swelling but no pain. Are you gum tissues swollen or do you a swelling in your mouth? Poor oral hygiene can lead to gum disease and cavities. Once the decay reaches the pulp you can get an abscess and occasionally it does not hurt. A dental x-ray will pinpoint the cause. Gum disease can cause the gum tissues to become swollen and bleed easily. Visit your dentist tomorrow. Read more...
Treat the problem. Not all dental problems, even serious ones elicit pain. Left untreated, that will probably come on soon enough. Have your dentist determine exactly what the problem is and discuss treatment options with you. Listen to your dentist's advice. If you don't trust your dentist, find another one. However, ultimately you have to follow a professional's advice. Read more...
Pain? Pain is not always a good indicator for a problem. Gum disease can be a very painless process, that is why it is so dangerous. If you have any doubts of what your doctor told you, get a second opinion.! Read more...
Take the advice. Let your dentist guide you on how to treat the problem. Swollen tissue is an indication of inflammation, and that means something is wrong. Do what your doctor tells you. Read more...

What are some non-dietary causes of excessive tooth decay in a 5yo? Right now, all I've got is mouth breathing and osa w/gerd.

You've nailed it.. Obstructive sleep apnea (osa) and gerd can be contributing factors to the problem. A dry mouth, together with caustic stomach acid, can wreak havoc to the teeth. Oral hygiene excellent? Need to work closely with your team of doctors to help solve the problem(s). Phenomenal oral hygiene a must, possible topical Fluoride application. Have the pediatric dentist monitor the situation. Read more...
3 Factors. Decay is a disease caused by bacteria that digest the sugars found in the diet. These germs excrete an acidic metabolic byproduct that demineralizes the tooth. In this process if you eliminate the germs (brushing, flossing) you eliminate the disease. If you increase the concentration of germs by reducing the saliva (medications) it can increase the impact of the acid ( more decay) see your dds. Read more...
Various causes. Poor hygiene, mouth breathing, apnea misalignment and stress. See a pedodontist for more information and consultation. Read more...

The right side of my jaw gets stiff and there is a clicking sound similar to a back being cracked when I try to open my mouth I suffer from severe tooth decay due to prior drug abuse. I've had all my molars, top and bottom, on both sides pulled about 5 ye

You . You are right - your jaw is shifting due to the loss of molars. Loss of teeth especially molars can affect the stability of temporomandibular joint. It is important to replace your missing teeth because shifting that is not within normal limits can cause tearing of fibers. It can also cause deep bite on the front teeth- that can result to chipping and cracking (worse if there was a malocclusion or bad bite from the beginning), .. These are merely few of the effects of missing teeth esp molars. Implant is a better choice than a denture. Read more...
It . It sounds as though your jaw discomfort is related to the loss of your back teeth and an altered relaionship in you 'tmj". The jaw joint is very sensitive to changes in position of the jaw when your bite changes and your tooth loss can certainly be the culprit. If teeth can be saved then some sort of partial denture could be made, but if your remaining teeth have shifted and this would contribute further to an altered bite, or if they are truly beyond repair, it might be better to think about complete replacement. With newer technology, implant supported dentures and other sophisticated "permanent" restorations can eliminate the problems traditionally associated with full dentures. Although these treatments can be expensive, they can be life changing for folks in your situation. Seek out a qualified prosthodontist for an evaluation, as this is the only way that you will know for sure what options are appropriate for you. Best of luck! Read more...
I . I am sorry to hear of your discomfort and concern. You certainly do need good dental care now. If it is at all possible to save remaining teeth that still have good boney support i always try to encourage a patient to do so, and design the removable partial denture around them. This way you have a more stable appliance in your mouth. The problem there might be that to save teeth will involve repairing them which does cost something. Now to your primary concern, that stiff jaw that clicks. These are symptoms of a damaged jaw joint that is not in a stable relationship with the surrounding tissues. I suspect that you have lost vertical height between the jaws having lost teeth, and that an uneven pressure is being placed on the clicking jaw joint by trying to close the teeth on the remaining teeth. I recommend that you see a dentist who specializes in the kind of treatment, a prosthodontist. I have posted alik that might be of use to you. Read more...
The . The pain in your jaws is due to the collapse of your chewing system (occlusion). Your teeth help to stabilize your lower jaw as well as provide a means for chewing, speaking and smiling. Whatever the end goal of restoring your teeth, you need to remove disease from your mouth. Maintain the teeth that are maintainable, remove the others and have your mouth restored to function. Once you get stable your jaw problems can be addressed, and you can begin to get out of pain. Read more...
Serious problem. Serious problem with jaw joint and overall dentition. I'd see your dentist and have him work with a TMJ expert. Any dentist can be a TMJ expert with the proper training and experience. Most commonly, oral surgeons, prosthodontists, and orofacial pain specialists. Ask your MD, your dentist and your dental society for referrals. Read more...
See a dentist. for evaluation, imaging and tooth decay and TMJ syndrome treatment. The good news is that both conditions are treatable. Read more...