My jaw keeps clicking. Is this a symptom of TMJ (temporomandibular joint dysfunction)?

Yes. The clicking noise is made when you open or close your mandible, the noise come because the disk that covers the mandibular condyle is slipping off or if it s squeezed while the mandible is moving. This is not a normal condition of your joints. If you have pain you need to seek help and in general an occlusal guard professionally made can do the trick.
NO. A clicking in your jaw joint indicates that either the cartilage is out of place or the boney structures are altered. Neither issue indicates a dysfunctional condition. There are many people who have clicking in their jaw joints and they function very well with no pain or limitations.
Many. Symptoms of tmj/tmd can vary from person to person, severity, location and duration. It can affect the ears: ringing, aching, roaring, stuffiness, hearing loss; head, facial and neck: headaches, neck and facial pain; locking of the jaw: closed lock- limited opening, open lock- can't close; bite problems: can't touch the teeth, grinding, clenching; toothaches; lose teeth, fatigue, etc.

Related Questions

Is bruxism (teeth-grinding) & TMJ (temporomandibular joint dysfunction) related?

Definitely. Someone may grind their teeth for a number of reasons. Often, the problem occurs because the muscles of the face and jaw are trying to get the teeth in a comfortable position. The muscles may be in spasm, you may have a tmj/tmd problem, stress, infection. Best to see a dentist asap. Often thew cause is difficult to determine, so may have to treat the symptoms with a mouthpiece. Read more...
Bruxism. Sleep bruxism is classified as a sleep related movement disorder and is not related to the how the teeth fit together. It is sometimes thought that sleep bruxism is responsible for TMJ problems but the literature is non conclusive on that issue. Read more...
Yes. When you clench or grind you load your jaw joint and muscles in your cheek with a tremendous amount of pressure. This pressure can eventually lead to a tremendous pain in the joint. Clicking, limited opening, and pain can be troublesome and a dds should be consulted for help. Hope all is well. Read more...
Yes. Yes, Bruxism exacerbates TMD and can in some cases be causative. Read more...

What to do if I need clarification for my temporomandibular joint dysfunction or tmj. Please help!?

See a dentist. Have you been to a dentist and have you been diagnosed with tm dysfunction? If not, you should see a dentist to discuss your symptoms, have a thorough evaluation and then treatment options can be presented. Read more...
See your dentist . If you are experiencing issues with your jaw joint(s), you should see your dentist to have them evaluate your symptoms and prescribe a course of treatment. Tmj treatments vary widely depending upon the particular symptomology. Good luck! Read more...
Research. Tmj/tmd exhibits a multitude of symptoms. You can go to websites and read up on some of the common symptoms, but a thorough evaluation by a specialist is highly recommended. Some symptoms, such as an infected tooth, cysts, and other causes may mimic 'tmj.' my website, www.Jbassmantmj.Com shows a symptom list, but you really should be examined to rule TMJ or not. Read more...

What is temporomandibular joint dysfunction tmj?

Common problem. Tmj stands for temperomandibular joint, but is often used to describe tmd. The d stands for dysfunction. Tmd is an inflamation of the jaw joint. It can be arthritic with wear and tear on the cartilage and bone, or due to muscle spasm of the overlying muscles. Sometimes if feels like an earache, or a headache on the side of your head above the ear. Read more...
Jaw pain. The primary cause is muscular hyper- or parafunction, as in the case of bruxism, with secondary effects on the oral musculoskeletal system, like various types of displacement of the disc in the temporomandibular joint. The disorder and resultant dysfunction can result in significant pain, which is the most common tmd symptom, combined with impairment of function. Read more...
TMJ? Any dysfunction of the jaw joint. . 3 signs of TMJ dysfunction: joint noises, joint pain & limited oral opening. See an oral & maxillofacial surgeon for advice. Read more...

What causes temporomandibular joint dysfunction TMJ vs tmd?

Mostly the same. Tmj is the name of the place where the lower jaw (mandible) meets with the skull. Tmd is a disorder of that joint. It's caused by lots of things, including the forces of chewing and grinding one's teeth. If you think you have this, stop chewing gum and very chewy foods then start with simple measures like otc Ibuprofen and warm compresses. In the end, most need a custom guard to protect teeth. Read more...
Not much. Tmj is a layman's term, and refers to the joint itself. Tm dysfunction involves the joint and it's internal structures as well as external ones, the surrounding musculature and fascia of the face, neck, shoulders and back? It can becaused by a bad bite and is related to posture, vertebral alignment and head position as well. Also, it's associated with tooth clenching and grinding and migraines. Read more...
Same thing. These usually refer to the same thing. Tmd is the disfunction of the tmj, the jaw joint. They can be multiple contributing factors including trauma, poor growth patterns of the face, clenching the teeth, poor nutrition, and stress. Read more...
Anatomy. Tmj refers to the temporomandibular joints, where the upper bone (maxilla- temporal bone) and the lower jaw (mandible) meet and function...The joints. This is a simplistic description and you should look this up on the web for a more definitive anatomical answer. Better terms for symptoms associated with the TMJ mechanism are tmd (temporomandibular dysfunction, ) or TMJ syndrome. Read more...
A few things. Causes of TMJ syndrome are not completely understood.. Causes may include, misalignment (malocclusion) of or trauma to the teeth or jaw, teeth grinding (bruxism),, poor posture, stress or anxiety, arthritis or other inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders, excessive gum chewing. Treatment can be complex and beyond the scope of this answer. See a TMJ expert for guidance. Read more...
TMD or TMJ? The difference between TMD and TMJ. TMD refers to temporomandibular joint disease or temporomandibular joint, anatomical structure. Read more...

My jaw feels locked most of the time. Could this be possible TMJ syndrome (temporomandibular joint disorder)?

Yes. Sure could be! that said, there is a lot that goes into diagnosing tmd accurately & what needs to be done to treat it. See your dentist to discuss the situation with them & what can be done to improve things. Read more...
Yes. I would suggest seeing a dentist with training in the field. See www.Aaop.Org or www.Aacfp.Org for a listing of dentists. If a jaw stays locked for a while it can become permanent. Read more...
TMJ Dysfunction. Yes. Your description is certainly relevant to TMJ syndrome or dysfunction. "locking" of the joint can happen when the cartilaginous disk that rests between the bones that make up this joint becomes displaced, which can make opening your jaw difficult or painful. Currently, there are several different treatment options available. I recommend a consultation with a qualified specialist in TMJ tx. Read more...
Symptom. Symptoms of tmj/tmd can vary from person to person, severity, location and duration. It can affect the ears: ringing, aching, roaring, stuffiness, hearing loss; head, facial and neck: headaches, neck and facial pain; locking of the jaw: closed lock- limited opening, open lock- can't close; bite problems: can't touch the teeth, grinding, clenching; toothaches; lose teeth, fatigue, etc. Read more...
Yes. Yes. Sounds like TMD. See a TMD specialist. Any dentist can be a TMJ expert with the proper training and experience. Most commonly, oral surgeons, prosthodontists, and orofacial pain specialists. Ask your MD, your dentist and your dental society for referrals. Read more...
Yes, TMJ syndrome. Patients with TMJ syndrome experience pain in the jaw, problems chewing, headache, difficulties opening or closing the mouth because the joint locks in place very often. If concerned, see your dentist or orthodontist for evaluation. Read more...

What are the common symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction?

Several. Tmd or TMJ usually is a true joint disorder or a dental problem that refers pain to the side of the face (otalgia). The most common symptoms are a dull ache near the ear and clicking of the jaw joint. The problem is often seen by ENT doctors because of the referred pain to the side of the face that causes the patient to think the ear is involved. See a dentist for a diagnosis. Read more...
Long list. The list is long and varied. You need not have them all. You may find yourself clenching or grinding your teeth. You can have joint pain in front of your ear or an earache. Also, headaches & neck/shoulder painare common. Limited jaw opening or deviation on opening can occur. Tender or tight jaw, neck or shoulder muscles. Noise in jaw joints is common. Your jaw can get stuck open/closed. Read more...
TMJ Symptoms. Jaw pain, especially at area of the joint; popping/clicking of jaw; ear pain, or sounds of cracking in the ears: ringing/popping sounds in the ears (tinnitus) or a sense of fullness in the ears: headaches; blurred vision: tight, stiff, or sore jaw or neck muscles: facial pain, cheek pain, or chin numbness or tingling: shoulder pain; locking or dislocation of the jaw (usually after widely yawning). Read more...

What is TMJ (temporomandibular joint)? What kind of health probides handle TMJ disorders and what are the symptoms?

TMJ\TMD. The term "tmj" stands for temporomandibular joint, and is the name of the two joints that connect your lower jaw to your skull. Many people suffer from tmd (temporomandibular dysfunction) which referes to a host of problems such as pain on opening\closing, joint noises, locking of the jaw, etc. General dentists, orthodontists, prosthodontists (and mfos) can treat this. A few specialize in this. Read more...
Jaw pain by the ear. The TMJ describes the anatomical junction of 4 muscles on each side of the jaw bone. Problems can be as simple as 'popping' noises to complex situations that require surgery. Most TMJ issues are very complex and successful treatment may include all facets of oral surgery, dentistry and physical therapy. But certainly, early detection is key to identifying problems before they become severe. Read more...
TMJ. Tmj or temporomandibular joint is the actual area of the jaw joint in front of the ear - the dental professional that usually can help determine the cause, as there are many causative factors, would be an orthodontist to start. There are many causes and symptoms of tmd (temporomandibular dysfunction), but the best place could be a referral from your general dentist or an orthodontist. Read more...
Jaw Joint. The TMJ is the jaw joints. Any patient can have treatment regardless of other health conditions. The classic triad of TMJ symptoms are joint pain, limited oral opending and joint noises. Many other symptoms possible. Read more...

What are the symptoms of TMJ (temporomandibular joint disorder)?

TMD. Jaw joint noises, limited mandibular range of motion, jaw muscle soreness and hypertrophy, bite changes, facial symetry changes, difficulty eating and/or speaking, frequent temporalis headaches. Read more...
Possibly. Some of the more common symptoms are clicking or popping in the jaw joint, limited opening, pain on opening in the joint area, pain in the muscles associated with chewing, pain while chewing, locking open or closed and noticeable deviation of the jaw to one side when opening. If you have any of these my advice would be to consult with a dentist that treats jaw joint issues. Read more...
Many symptoms. Jaw pain, especially at area of the joint; popping/clicking of jaw; ear pain, or sounds of cracking in the ears: ringing/popping sounds in the ears (tinnitus) or a sense of fullness in the ears: headaches; blurred vision: tight, stiff, or sore jaw or neck muscles: facial pain, cheek pain, or chin numbness or tingling: shoulder pain; locking or dislocation of the jaw (usually after widely yawning). Read more...

Can I use a tens to relieve temporomandibular joint dysfunction?

Possible. I have no experience with this. I am uncertain since the pads are so large. You have to wear it across the face. Read more...
Tens and TMD. The answer to this questions is maybe. It really depends what kind of tens unit you have ? You need tens that delivers controlled, periodic, bilateral electrical stimulation to help provide muscle relaxation, increased blood circulation and increased range of motion. You also need to have it placed in the right area. You should also be under dental supervision. Read more...
Yes. Yes. Non invasive. No harm trying. Helps mostly as an adjunct to comprehensive TMJ treatment. Read more...