11 doctors weighed in:
What kind of anesthesia do they put u on for eye surgery?
11 doctors weighed in

Dr. Scott Roethle
Anesthesiology
4 doctors agree
In brief: It depends...
Depending on the type of eye surgery, you may have local anesthetic, sedation, or general anesthesia.
Often, heavy sedation is used to perform an "eye block" for anesthesia, and then you receive light sedation for comfort. Few more complex or emergent eye procedures require general anesthesia. Most common eye surgeries such as Lasix (furosemide) or cataracts are done using local anesthetic and maybe sedation.

In brief: It depends...
Depending on the type of eye surgery, you may have local anesthetic, sedation, or general anesthesia.
Often, heavy sedation is used to perform an "eye block" for anesthesia, and then you receive light sedation for comfort. Few more complex or emergent eye procedures require general anesthesia. Most common eye surgeries such as Lasix (furosemide) or cataracts are done using local anesthetic and maybe sedation.
Dr. Scott Roethle
Dr. Scott Roethle
Thank
Dr. Scott Mackinnon
Anesthesiology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Local with iv sedati
Most eye procedures are done with local("novacaine") with what we refer to as IV sedation.
It is also referred to as "mac"(monitored anesthetic care). The sedation helps keep a patient comfortable during the procedure and the "local" will render the eye numb and one will not feel anything.

In brief: Local with iv sedati
Most eye procedures are done with local("novacaine") with what we refer to as IV sedation.
It is also referred to as "mac"(monitored anesthetic care). The sedation helps keep a patient comfortable during the procedure and the "local" will render the eye numb and one will not feel anything.
Dr. Scott Mackinnon
Dr. Scott Mackinnon
Thank
Dr. David Rosenfeld
Pain Management
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Several
Either topical anesthetic or retro bulbar block (local anesthetic behind eye) are used with sedation.
General anesthesia is also used.

In brief: Several
Either topical anesthetic or retro bulbar block (local anesthetic behind eye) are used with sedation.
General anesthesia is also used.
Dr. David Rosenfeld
Dr. David Rosenfeld
Thank
Dr. David Edsall
Anesthesiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Cataract or other?
Local plus a little sedation.
For other eye surgery usually general with a breathing tube so that you hold perfectly still.

In brief: Cataract or other?
Local plus a little sedation.
For other eye surgery usually general with a breathing tube so that you hold perfectly still.
Dr. David Edsall
Dr. David Edsall
Thank
Dr. Richard Grisoli
Anesthesiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Iv sedation
Iv sedation.

In brief: Iv sedation
Iv sedation.
Dr. Richard Grisoli
Dr. Richard Grisoli
Thank
Dr. Richard Pollard
Anesthesiology
In brief: See below
For cataracts and the like they would use a topical anesthetic on the eye with some IV sedation.
For more extensive surgery on the eye they might use a general anesthetic. Talk to your ophthalmologist to see what they expect and need.

In brief: See below
For cataracts and the like they would use a topical anesthetic on the eye with some IV sedation.
For more extensive surgery on the eye they might use a general anesthetic. Talk to your ophthalmologist to see what they expect and need.
Dr. Richard Pollard
Dr. Richard Pollard
Thank
Dr. Matt Malkin
Anesthesiology
In brief: It depends
Most eye surgeries can be done without general anesthesia.
Cataract removals can often be done with numbing eye drops alone. Others may require a short sedation while a retrobulbar block is done (injection behind the eye). Others, like ruptured globe, may require general anesthesia. The anesthesiologist and opthomologist will come up with a plan with you.

In brief: It depends
Most eye surgeries can be done without general anesthesia.
Cataract removals can often be done with numbing eye drops alone. Others may require a short sedation while a retrobulbar block is done (injection behind the eye). Others, like ruptured globe, may require general anesthesia. The anesthesiologist and opthomologist will come up with a plan with you.
Dr. Matt Malkin
Dr. Matt Malkin
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Buck Parker
Board Certified, Surgery
13 years in practice
467K people helped
Continue
107,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors