Is there a way to have my insurance approve an oral surgeon to remove my wisdom teeth. They are piercing through my cheeks and shattered a tooth.

Eligible benefit? Not all insurance plans are the same. Some medical insurance plans exclude dental coverage including the surgical removal of wisdom teeth. Your surgeon's office can contact your insurance company to determine if benefits are available, and/or submit a narrative to request coverage or appeal a denial.
Talk to office. Depending on your insurance plan, sometimes a narrative report by the doctor may assist you in helping to receive his services. If not, you may wish to try the local dental school. Keep smiling !
Speak to surgeon. It is the oral surgeon that gets the approval for the treatment. You need to have dental insurance.
Possibly. Surgical removal of wisdom teeth usually is covered by dental insurance but sometimes is covered by medical insurance. First talk directly with your insurance company about what is covered by your plan and if you need to go to an oral surgeon on panel. Then contact med ins co if not covered. The surgeon's office may be able to assist you by submitting a pre-d for surgery charges.
Dental insurance. You must have dental insurance firstly, and there are so many rules and hoops to jump through, the oral surgeon's office can hopefully help you navigate this. I cannot think of any incident whereby a wisdom tooth shatters another healthy molar, if it is as you say, it is a coincidence.
Yes there is, if... Most dental insurance policies will provide benefits for surgical services. Some hmo/capitation plans require that your primary care general dentist request authorization for specialty referral, and removal of impacted wisdom teeth is clearly a job for a specialist. If you do not have dental insurance, your medical plan may or may not provide benefits as well.

Related Questions

I got a referral from my dentist to see an oral surgeon to remove my wisdom teeth. What happens now? Do I call the surgeon and make an appointment?

Yes. You will probably be seen for a consultation if this is not an emergency, and then be scheduled for the extraction(s). Read more...
Yes and. If you had x-rays taken, ask that they make you a copy or if digital, forward them to the oral surgeon. Read more...
Call and schedule. Schedule an appointment and ask the oral surgeon all the questions you have about the extractions and what to expect during healing. It is important that you understand what will be done during the procedure and afterwards during healing. Read more...
Find a new Dentist. Your dentist who referred you should have either called the office of the surgeon they want you to see, or they should have given you the phone number and asked you to make an appointment. Seems like there was lack of communication. I'd call your dentist and ask them if they've spoken to the oral surgeon, or it they want you to call and schedule. Keep smiling ! Read more...

Is it uncommon to have your wisdom teeth removed by a dentist and not an oral surgeon?

Yes-depends. I assume the dentist who will do it feels he is qualified and capable. Many general dentists can do surgery. It is up to the individual dentist and whether you have confidence in that dentist. Generally an oral surgeon is better trained for the procedure, but it also depends on how bad is your impacted tooth. It may also depend on your insurance benefits whether any oral surgeon will accept you. Read more...
No. This all depends on the complexity of the extractions and the skill, judgement and experience of the general dentist performing the procedure. A general dentist can do these procedures if they have continued extensive training in oral surgery and have developed the skill and judgement over time. Read more...
Wisdom teeth. There are several levels of difficulty with wisdom teeth. The more difficult the more likely you would benefit from treatment with an oral surgeon. Some dentists remove wisdom teeth occasionally while oral surgeons do it regularly. Read more...
Not at all. There are many general dentists who feel very comfortable in removing wisdom teeth successfully. Read more...
Not at all. No, many general dentists are quite capable of removing wisdom teeth. However, if your dentist does not offer IV sedation, and this is something you feel you would need or prefer, i'd recommend an oral surgeon. They routinely perform these procedures with sedation, often making the experience much more tolerable for the patient. Keep smiling ! Read more...

My oral surgeon said that taking estradiol would help the clots when I have my wisdom teeth removed. Is this true?

It can. However avoid spitting, use of straws or smoking for a few days. Also applying pressure over the extraction sites using gauze will stop the bleeding. If you follow these instructions your blood clots will be intact and you should not bleed. Read more...
Estradiol. One of the benefits of Estradiol is it's ability to help prevent osteoporosis. The same mechanism that helps with preserving bone may be of benefit with the healing of your extraction site. Read more...

My oral surgeon said that my taking estradiol would create clots when I have my wisdom teeth removed?

Not really. Estrogen promotes platelet activity but only a little. And it's not a problem, we want you to stop bleeding when you have surgery! Read more...
Doubtful. According to my resources, Estradiol does not have any known effects on dental treatment, but does have a possible side effect of venous thromboembolism (blood clots). I would get a second opinion. Read more...

Got my wisdom teeth removed. All went smoothly but oral surgeon mentioned that my heart rate was over 100 the entire time? Is this normal? I'm an athlet

Tachycardia . See your MD get a CBC. It's possible you were dehydrated or mildly anemic. An increased heart rate always has a reason and it's the underlying cause that needs to be determined. Pain and anxiety are also common reasons for tachycardia Infection, anemia , drugs and medications like decongestants , low blood pressure, and sometimes arrhythmia are other causes. Good luck to you. . Read more...
Depends . Were you given only local anesthetic (shot), or did you go to sleep? Were you nervous before and during the procedure? Athletes typically have a low resting heart rate that can accelerate to quite a high level under stress. This all sounds normal but if you're concerned, see Your Physician for a stress test. More questions? www.healthtap.com/dr-douglasdds For an inbox consult. Read more...

Need 3 wisdom teeth out, oral surgeon needs to cut through gums and bone, having it done under GA due to CRPS. How much pain should I expect? Swelling? Recovery time?

Ask your Specialist. No two people are alike. The person that can best answer your questions is the one that examined you and who is going to treat you. For us to comment would just be a guesstimate. Your Surgeon can give you more precise individualized answers. Read more...
Surgical extractions. The most accurate answer could be given by the dentist who has evaluated you clinically, seen x-rays of the teeth involved and know your medical and dental history. Ask. Pain, swelling and recovery time varies from tooth to tooth and individual to individual. Read more...

The oral surgeon won't see me until next week and I'm really in pain with my wisdom teeth. What can I do?

OTC pain med, diet. An over the counter pain medicine - ibuprofen or ketoprofen is best if you can take them; extra strength tylenol (acetaminophen) is less effective. Soft diet, sleeping with head elevated (extra pillows or recliner) may help. Warm salt water rinse can help depending upon the exact problem. Read more...
Emergency dentist. A wisdom tooth pain won't go away without treatment and the infection may spread to your jaw, cheeks, sinus and to other areas of your head and neck. Emergency help available 24/7 through 1-800-DENTIST. Call 1-800 dentist for an appointment no. Read more...

I only have 2 wisdom teeth in. My oral surgeon won't let me have just a local & laughing gas. He says I need to go under IV sedation. Why is this?

Surgical extractions. It may be that the position of these teeth and the formation of the roots make for a difficult extraction. There may be a need to cut the teeth, remove bone, etc, etc. It could be traumatic, both mentally and physically. Wouldn't it be better to sleep through the entire process and be given amnesic medication so that you don't remember anything? Just a thought.. Read more...
Informed consent. Goose - it seems that you missed a critical part of your consultation: understanding how difficult your two wisdom teeth may be to remove. Without understanding this from your surgeon, you can't make an intelligent choice of anesthetic. Go back and ask why he recommends IV sedation and any other ?'s you now have. You need to be better informed to consent to your surgery. Read more...
Ask Him. I recommend you ask your doctor. My suspicion is that these teeth may be impacted and may require a more difficult procedure to remove them. If this is so, then he is looking out for your best interest. With lots of drilling and manipulation to remove these teeth (if indeed that's the case), would you seriously want to do this without IV sedation? I wouldn't ! keep smiling ! Read more...
Depends. Depends on the surgeon, the patient, and the tooth. If the extraction is difficult, you may need it. Most cases however can be done under local anesthesia. Get another opinion. Read more...