What is the difference between sinusitis and a tooth infection?

Cause. A tooth infection usually is a root canal or gum abscess. In upper posterior teeth if this abscess is near or in the sinus, it can also cause a sinusitis. A sinusitis is more often caused by a virus (cold) or bacteria .
Different structure. Sinusitis is inflammation of your sinuses, most often due to an infection. Tooth infection is an abscess from bacteria infiltrating your bone through a decayed tooth. You can have one and not the other.

Related Questions

Can maxiliary sinusitis lead to tooth infection?

Rarely. Usually it is the other way around. The dental abscess erodes into the sinus. Sinusitis can definitely cause tooth pain As the nerves for your upper teeth run along the floor of the sinus and the pressure and inflammation from the sinus irritate the nerves. If your are having severe tooth pain have your dentist check to make sure there is not a dental problem contributing to your sinus problem. Read more...
Highly unlikely. A tooth infection is caused by a nerve in the tooth that has become non-vital, and/or a very large cavity that has extended into the pulp chamber that is allowing bacteria to enter the bone through the tooth. Sinusitis (inflammation of the sinus) would not do that. Read more...
The opposite is true. It is certainly possible that an infected tooth, usually the first maxillary molar, can cause a sinusitis. The sinusitis, is an inflammation of the sinuses and nasal passages. It does not lead to tooth infection. Both infections are treatable with a predictable positive outcome. Hope it helps. Read more...

Does maxillary sinusitis mean there is a tooth infection?

Maxillary infection. No, not necessarily. Deep root infections of the upper teeth can lead to maxillary sinus infection, but not always. More likely your maxillary sinusitis evolved from inadequate sinus clearance of mucus and associated bacteria. Read more...
No. An infected tooth is a whole different kettle of fish. The maxillary sinuses are in your cheek areas, above /behind the teeth. That's not to say a severe dental infection couldn't get up into the maxillary sinuses - it can. But you can have perfectly healthy teeth and develop a maxillary sinus infection. This is particularly true for those of us who have seasonal allergies and it's ragweed season! Read more...
No. Sinusitis is inflammation of the sinus, and is not necessarily caused by a tooth infection. Read more...
No, sinus infection. also called sinusitis, is an inflammation of the sinuses and nasal passages. It is certainly possible that an infected tooth, usually the first maxillary molar, can cause a sinusitis. Both infections are treatable with a predictable positive outcome. Hope it helps. Read more...

Is it possible to have maxillary sinusitis without any other symptoms other than horrible jaw pain and not have a tooth infection?

Very much so. The scenario can be just as you describe. If you are a smoker it is more likely to happen. The most common is not to have a tooth infection. Antibiotics are usually required. See your doctor to be treated immediately. Read more...
Yes, it is possible. Sinusitis, is an inflammation of the sinuses and nasal passages. It is certainly possible that an infected tooth, usually the first maxillary molar, can cause a sinusitis. Both infections are treatable with a predictable positive outcome. Hope it helps. Read more...
Yup. Has happened to me personally during allergy season. Not uncommon at all. Read more...