10 doctors weighed in:

The fna showed papillary thyroid cancer. Is it possible for surgical pathology to be benign? I haven't had surgery yet. Nodules are on both lobes.

10 doctors weighed in
2 doctors agree

In brief: Very unlikely.

If a thyroid fna was interpreted as papillary carcinoma, it would be highly unlikely for subsequent excision to show only benign findings.
When a pathologist calls a thyroid fna cancer, there is >98% probability that the excision will confirm the diagnosis of malignancy. If you question the diagnosis from the fna, you could request a second opinion on the pathology slides. Hope this helps...

In brief: Very unlikely.

If a thyroid fna was interpreted as papillary carcinoma, it would be highly unlikely for subsequent excision to show only benign findings.
When a pathologist calls a thyroid fna cancer, there is >98% probability that the excision will confirm the diagnosis of malignancy. If you question the diagnosis from the fna, you could request a second opinion on the pathology slides. Hope this helps...
Dr. Charles Sturgis
Dr. Charles Sturgis
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Dr. Douglas Miller
Pathology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Unlikely

When a thyroid fna shows carcinoma, it is virtually certain that the subsequent surgical specimen will also.
You ought to have the surgery as soon as possible. Delay only allows a greater chance for metastatic spread to other body sites.

In brief: Unlikely

When a thyroid fna shows carcinoma, it is virtually certain that the subsequent surgical specimen will also.
You ought to have the surgery as soon as possible. Delay only allows a greater chance for metastatic spread to other body sites.
Dr. Douglas Miller
Dr. Douglas Miller
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Dr. Michael Nordstrom
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Papillary Cancer

Unfortunately you need to have the surgery.
If the fna showed this it is very unlikely that is inaccurate. Pathologists don't take lightly the responsibility they have in making these diagnoses. I would anticipate a total thyroidectomy being recommended.

In brief: Papillary Cancer

Unfortunately you need to have the surgery.
If the fna showed this it is very unlikely that is inaccurate. Pathologists don't take lightly the responsibility they have in making these diagnoses. I would anticipate a total thyroidectomy being recommended.
Dr. Michael Nordstrom
Dr. Michael Nordstrom
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Dr. Barry Kahn
Pathology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Very low

Statistically, the probability of a "false positive result" is on the order of several percent (i.
e. Very low). If fna's of both nodules occurred and both were diagnosed as papillary carcinoma, then the chance of two false positive results, is significantly lower than 1%. It sounds like you should have those nodules removed surgically.

In brief: Very low

Statistically, the probability of a "false positive result" is on the order of several percent (i.
e. Very low). If fna's of both nodules occurred and both were diagnosed as papillary carcinoma, then the chance of two false positive results, is significantly lower than 1%. It sounds like you should have those nodules removed surgically.
Dr. Barry Kahn
Dr. Barry Kahn
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Dr. Steve Martinez
Breast Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Low false positive

Fna has a really low false positive rate.
That is, it is very unlikely that the fna says a nodule is cancer when in fact it is benign. You need to have your thyroid removed. See an experienced thyroid surgeon.

In brief: Low false positive

Fna has a really low false positive rate.
That is, it is very unlikely that the fna says a nodule is cancer when in fact it is benign. You need to have your thyroid removed. See an experienced thyroid surgeon.
Dr. Steve Martinez
Dr. Steve Martinez
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Inderjit Deol
Interpretation of FNA report is essential in this case. It may say: Papilary carcinoma: means that it is a papillary carcinoma. In this case you have to have surgical removal. Ot it may say: Suspicious or suggestive of papillary carcinoma. In this case you may not need removal but do need surgical biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Either case you should have surgical consultation.
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