Can I get jaw surgery to fix an under-bite?

Yes. Orthognathic surgery is jaw surgery performed usually in conjunction with orthodontic treatment to correct a mismatch in the jaws related to a skeletal problem. A detailed examination and workup by an orthodontist, working together with a surgeon will result in a comprehensive treatment plan to properly correct your bite problem.
Orthodontic consult. First-consult with the best orthodontist in your area. You may want to even get 2nd and 3rd opinions. There are many options, but only with a thorough and careful orthodontic workup can you get the answers that you deserve. Under certain conditions, there are surgical procedures that are used in conjunction with conventional orthodontics.
Yes, but. Yes, but depends on degree. Sometimes braces enough. See a competent orthodontist for evaluation and treatment options. If surgery indicated. make sure surgeon is a board certified oral & maxillofacial surgeon.

Related Questions

I have braces and I am planning on getting jaw surgery to get rid of my under bite. I need more info on it. Can anyone help?

Ask your surgeon. Your orthodontist and/or your surgeon would be the best source for information as they are the ones most knowledgeable about what type of surgery will be required to correct your problem. Another source would be a search on the internet. Read more...
Jaw surgery. I think you should sit down with a surgeon for couple of hours and discuss the surgery, including the procedure, outcome, risks. Read more...
Talk with ortho & OS. If you are "in" braces", then you should have been examined, diagnosed and properly informed about the plan of surgical treatment. The jaw surgery to correct your underbite could be surgical reduction of the lower jaw or forward surgical positioning of the upper jaw or both. The orthodontist and os are a team working together, and they should explain all aspects of the procedures to you. Read more...

I am having a double jaw surgery to adjust my under-bite. Would this be considered a routine surgery?

Depends. That all depends on what you would consider "routine". From the surgeon's standpoint, it might be routine, but from your's-far from it. It is a not uncommon surgery, but complex in nature. The results are usually quite remarkable, and I have never had a patient who has gone through this have any regrets. As you recover, keep your focus on the end result-it will improve your future quality of life. Read more...
Common. Think of something as routine and you make mistakes. This is a big deal to the patient, but it is very common, and I have been involved in countless 2 jaw surgery cases over the years. Profile considerations dictate why an oral surgeon and orthodontist would choose this. Your underbite is due to too large of a lower jaw and a lack of midface (upper) projection. Common, but not ho-hum. Read more...

Is it safe to have jaw surgery for under bite at 16?

OrthoSurgery consult. My answer would be to consult with at least two of the best orthodontists in your area for a consult as to what is best for you. Then, consult with an oral surgeon or routinely performs this type of surgery, is well respected in the dental community and has a good working relationship with your orthodontist. All surgeries have some risks. Discuss risks and benefits with your doctors. Read more...
Sure. Safety isnt the issue. Proper diagnosis of your problem, and the appropriate surgeons and anesthesiologists will ensure your safety. Read more...
Growth. Typically patients are still growing at age 16 so i would advise against doing this at this time. However, make sure you check with your orthodontist and have him or her do sequential x-rays to check for facial growth. Read more...
Group Decision. Generally orthodontic alignment of the upper teeth and the lower teeth are done first before jaw surgery. Then the surgery is done matching the upper teeth with the lower teeth. Therefore this is a combined treatment plan between you, the orthodontist and the oral surgeon. Thus they will set the appropriate timeline rather than you guessing. Read more...
Cause. Depends on cause. If problem is upper jaw too far back, and pt is female, 16 May be OK. If lower jaw too far forward, or both upper and lower jaws involved, 16 is too early, especially for boys. See qualified Orthodontist who will also have you see the Oral Surgeon on his/her team for information as it applies to your particular set of circumstances. Read more...
Yes. its safe. I'd be great if you could solve your issues orthodontically without surgery, but if the orthodontist says surgery is needed, you'll be fine. Read more...
It is safe. With the latest advances in orthognatic surgery, this is sometimes the case and recommended. Please check with your orthodontist, or even get second and third opinions and you'll have a better idea and education. Good luck. Read more...
Oral surgeon decides. I would check with the orthodontist and oral surgeon performing the surgery. Usually, the age is eighteen, to make sure growth has curtailed, but the orthodontist that works in conjunction with the oral surgeon will decide. Has the orthodontist attempted conservative orthodontic therapy first? Read more...
Save yes. It is safe. However there are factors which make the timing of the surgery important. This type of surgery is usually coordinated between oral surgeon and orthodontist. They are best able so assess your situation. Talk to them. Read more...

I have an underbite but my molar and pre molar teeth are aligned. I have spaces on my lower front teeth. Do I need jaw surgery to fix it?

Can't tell. I would have to examine you to answer that question. From your description, however, it's possible that your problem may be resolvable with Orthodontic treatment alone. See a qualified Orthodontic Specialist for evaluation. Read more...
Orthodontist eval. Typically, underbites and overbites can be corrected by any number of means such as braces and corrective gear. Surgery is an option of there is misalignment or maldevelopment needing to balance the skull and jaw areas. A good thorough Orthodontist evaluation should be able to tell you if you will need surgery or not. Read more...
Orthognathic surgery. Jaw surgery is more likely required when there is a skeletal or jaw discrepancy present rather than a tooth alignment problem. Most cases can be treated with conventional Orthodontics. You should see at least one Board Certified Orthodontist for a proper workup and evaluation and consultation in order to get accurate answers to your questions that cannot be given over the internet, sight unseen. Read more...

Is underbite jaw surgery 100% safe?

Mostly safe . Like any surgical procedure, jaw surgery carries a certain risk such as infection, bleeding and adverse reaction to anesthetic. The risk overall is not significant however compared with the benefits of correcting your underbite. Good luck! Read more...
No. Nothing is 100% safe, it a matter of risk to benefit ratio. Orthodontists (like me) and almost all health professionals look to the least invasive means for correction of problems. There maybe alternatives to surgery with an underbite, especially if it is not severe. While orthognathic surgery is invasive, it rarely produces unacceptable risks. Read more...
No. No surgical procedure is 100% free of potential complication. Your surgeon will go over the potential problems that may arise during or after the surgery. Read more...
Informed consent. Surgery of any type has associated risks. It is important to get a clear picture of the risks and benefits as part of complete informed consent with your oral surgeon and orthodontist. Read more...
No. No medical or dental procedure comes with a written guarantee. Any and all procedures carry some risk of complications and failure. Read more...
No. Like any surgery there is inherent risks. You are not 100% safe driving your car. Talk with an orthodontist and an oral surgeon and get all these questions answered. Read more...
Unanimous. It's unanimous - jaw surgery is not 100% safe. No surgery is 100% safe. In the hands of a board certified oral & maxillofacial surgeon, orthognathic surgery is very safe. Ask surgeon about risks. Read more...

Could an underbite jaw surgery really hurt?

Prepare well. Your surgical team repeats this type of surgeries for many patients. They are very aware of post-surgery pain and how to help you with it. If you tend to do poorly after any trauma, letting your family and doctor know will be helpful. This prepares them well. In addition, it is good to prepare yourself well. Patients who know how to stay calm and relax heals better, and experience less pain. Read more...
Yes. Post surgical discomfort will normally accompany jaw surgery to correct and underbite. The amount of discomfort is related to the difficulty of the surgery, the technique of stabilization, and whether it was a one jaw or two jaw proceedure. As with all surgeries, it is important to ask these types of questions with the surgeon directly. Read more...
Surgery hurts. There's no getting around it. Much less problematic today than just a few years ago because of improvements in surgical techniques and medications. Sometimes there's no choice, it's the only way to resolve your problem. Having one jaw not match the other is like having one leg shorter than the other, eventually everything gets thrown off. Talk to BOTH qualified Orthodontic and Oral Surgeon. Read more...
Mild-moderate. Post op pain controlled quite well with prescribed narcotic pain medication. Ask you oral & maxillofacial surgeon for complete information pre and post op. Read more...

Is there any medical benefit to underbite jaw surgery.

Jaw Surgery Benefits. YES do it. This procedure corrects you bite, improves chewing function will improve your self-esteem tremendously. Not doing this will cause your bite to deteriorate during the 3rd-4th -5th decades of life. I am a hospital trained DDS and assisted the Oral surgeons with this. Girls changed hughly with improved studies clothing selection, weight control, better friends, generally became sucessful. Read more...
Yes. If teeth and jaws fit better they work better and are easier to clean, reducing chance of gum disease. Improperly positions teeth/jaws increase the wear and tear to your teeth and their supporting structures. You should see a qualified Orthodontic Specialist for more information. Read more...
Yes, there might be. some benefit to underbite jaw surgery in regards to your airway. Many patients who have underbites also suffer from sleep apnea due to a small upper jaw. Often, during underbite surgery, the upper jaw is moved forward which will allow for better nasal breathing and more opportunity to reduce snoring and sleep apnea problems. Read more...
Many. Yes, Better overal occlusion and chewing efficiency. Opens airway to decrease breathing problems. Helps maintain dental and periodontal health. Enhanced esthetic balance of face. Possible decrease in TMJ dysfunction. Read more...

How bad does an underbite need to be in order to have jaw surgery?

Jaw surgery. An orthodontist normally decides when the jaw discripency needs surgery due to open bite or cross bite which can't be treated alone by orthodontist. Read more...
Not bad at all. Some underbites can be corrected with tooth movement alone (ie. Orthodontics) but, if the bite is unstable or unattractive a jaw surgery procedure is necessary to achieve the optimum results. This discussion should start with the orthodontist and include the oral surgeon. Make sure to go to an orthodontist who feels comforatable doing "surgical" cases and doesn't try to overcompensate. Read more...
Depends. Depending on the underbite, whether it be 'teeth only' underbite or a combination of teeth and jaw differences, as well as patient's soft tissue profile will all play into what would be the best turnout or decision. Best to have an evaluation with the orthodontist. Read more...
Depends. If the orthodontic is determined to be a skeletal problem (the jaw positions or sizes are not compatible) then the malocclusion is best treated surgically. If there is a minor discrepancy in jaw size or if the malocclusion is of a dental nature (tooth size or position) then the malocclusion can be treated with braces (+/- extractions), . Read more...
Really depends. A non surgical correction entails tipping your upper teeth out while tipping your lower teeth in. If your teeth are already tipped in those directions, you may need surgery. If your teeth are tipped in the opposite way, you may look great with just orthodontics alone. Read more...
Bad enough. Bad enough that non-surgical Orthodontic Treatment will not resolve the malocclusion. Please consult with a qualified Orthodontic Specialist. As no two malocclusions are alike the Orthodontist will have to evaluate your malrelationships and then recommend the best treatment for you. Read more...
Depends. Depends on a number of factors. Most important is initial assessment by board certified orthodontist skilled in both surgical and non-surgical treatment. Sometimes correction can be either surgical or non-surgical, with pros and cons that should b presented to patient. Also consider oral surgical opinion before you start orthodontic treatment. Read more...