What is patella femoral syndrome?

Kneecap problems. Your patella is your knee cap and patello femoral syndrome is a term that covers a broad range of kneecap problems ranging from arthritis, to pain to mild instability and maltracking.

Related Questions

What causes patella femoral syndrome?

Many things. Jumping can do it. Patellar mistracking can do it. Hypermobility can do it. Cycling with to short a seat can do it. There are many causes I have not mentioned. And finally, any combination of factors make it more likely.
Normal activities. Patellofemoral syndrome can be caused by normal activities, athletic activities, and in part due to genetics (what genes your parents gave you). It will usually improve with physical therapy. This is not due to arthriti.

Best way of curing patella femoral syndrome?

Time... Ah, the runner's knee! I hope you went to see a sport specialist. Ice the knee 20-30 minutes every 3-4 hours for several days if this is new. Rest the leg with a pillow beneath the knee. Use some anti-inflammatory nsaids and physical therapy by a professional. Abstain from using the knee/leg for a while. Be patient, it should pass with time and attention.

Can I use a mini exercise bike for patella femoral syndrome?

Yes. Absolutely, try to avaoid impact activities and deep flexion exercises such as lunges. These put a lot of stress on the patella. Keep your quads stretched and cross train.

How is patella-femoral syndrome caused? Is it the result of an injury or is it natural?

Patellar maltracking. While it can be related to injury or overuse (runner's knee), it is more likely due to structural vulnerabilities such as muscle imbalance or "maltracking". This happens more commonly in women.

Can patella femoral syndrome be caused by jumping?

Yes and no. Jumping can do it. Patellar mistracking can do it. Hypermobility can do it. Cycling with to short a seat can do it. There are many causes I have not mentioned. And finally, any combination of factors make it more likely.

Is surgery necessary for patella femoral syndrome?

No. Patellofemoral syndrome is a common source of anterior knee pain and it is often related to mild patellar maltracking. Usually physical therapy, activity modification, and a short course of anti-inflammatory medication will do the trick. In most cases, surgery is not indicated. Ask your orthopaedic surgeon.

I have patella femoral syndrome. Can I use a mini stationary bike to do my exercises?

Great idea. Hi, thanks for the question. A stationary bike is a great idea for you. Low impact exercises are good. Also avoid deep knee flexion and stairs (especially going down). Depending on the exact diagnosis, quad strengthening, usually focusing on the vastus medialis will help. Ample stretching is also a good idea. Best regards and good luck...Adrianna, let me know how you do!

Do you have any tips for someone to deal with frequent walking who has patella femoral syndrome?

Stretch quads. You should regularly stretch your quadriceps muscles and avoid deep knee bending exercises. Perform terminal extension strengthening exercises with light weights only like 1/4 squats or leg presses, avoid stair masters, keep you bike seat up higher, don't do lunges, ice your knee after exercises. Plan a day of rest at least between leg exercise days for recovery.

17 and had a lateral release 2 years ago for patella femoral syndrome. I still have pain, should I get more surgery to correct it?

Patellofemoral pain. Repeat surgery should be reserved for those that have maximized and failed conservative measures. This would include a complete kinetic chain eval including gait, range of motion and strength. Tis would be at the knee and areas remote from the knee that contribute to patellar glide. Also considerations for mcconnell or kinesiotaping for neurofacillatory improvement.
Quad. I strongly recommend less is better regarding patellofemoral surgery. Recurrent or persistant pain in the pf joint can be due to under rehabilitation of the the distal quad. Also persistant chondromalacia. Also look to the foot and see if you have a flexible flat foot, arch supports would go a long way to treat the knee pain. You may consider a mri. But try as much conservative treatment/rehab.