How to treat a grade 3 tear posterior horn medial meniscus and an ACL tear?

ACL reconstruction. When they do reconstruction they will either take out the torn posterior horn or repair it if that needed.
Surgery. The standard treatment is a knee arthroscopy to reconstruct the acl with tissue that is taken from you or from a cadaver. The meniscus is treated with either a repair or removing the torn portion.

Related Questions

Grade 3 tear posterior horn medical meniscus and ACL tear, what to do?

ACL tear at age 42. Tough call but if you are experiencing instability you may have to consider repair. One reason to repair is to prevent further damage of menisci . ACL tears can be treated non-operatively with success but you have to modify activities permanently. If you aren't willing to do that then surgery may be better answer for you. Must consider work as well, can you take time off? Can you work now? . Read more...
Surgery. See an orthopedic sports medicine knee specialist, who will m ost likely recommend surgery for your issue. Read more...

Grade 3 tear posterior horn medical meniscus and also ACL tear, what to do?

You need surgery. . Young people with an acl tear and meniscus injury are at risk for further knee injury and damage with loss of function without surgery. Surgery consists of arthroscopic acl reconstruction and menisectomy versus meniscus repair. Typically it should be done by a fellowship trained sports medicine otthopaedist. . Read more...

What are treatments for a grade 3 tear posterior horn medical meniscus and ACL tear?

Surgery vs Therapy. Most healthy, active people with a torn medial meniscus require arthroscopic surgery to treat the tear. Reconstructing the acl, becomes a more difficult problem. It is a bigger surgery, requiring 6 months to 1 year of rehab. Decision for surgery is based on an individual basis. Read more...
Surgery. Usually one would require an ACL reconstruction, with a partial medial meniscectomy. Read more...

What are options chronic deg tear do acl, posterior horn of medial meniscus, tricompartmental changes as before full thickness cartilaginous defects s?

Osteoarthritis. That description is arthritis of the knee. Treatment of knee arthritis goes sequentially from less invasive to more invasive. Begin with activity modification, weight loss, physical therapy , antibinflammatory meds, and then move to more invasive options such as cortisone injections or visco supplementary injections. Surgical options include arthroscopy (poor results), partial knee replacement, & total knee replacement. Read more...
Variable. Anti inflammatory medication meds, steroid injection, joint juice injection, total knee. See your doc. Read more...

My mothers MRI came back showing chronic degenerative tear of the acl, chronic degenerative tear of the posterior horn of the medial medial meniscus.?

Old injuries. These reflect old injuries of the knee and usually have very little to do with her current problems. An acl reconstruction is the last thing she would need. More likely she has quad weakness causing limping along with hamstring tendinitis with pain on the inner thigh and leg. Giving way, leg burning, and night pain are likely. Quad exercises and at most a knee scope and meniscectomy would help. Read more...
Acl tear. Older patients will sometimes have MRI readings showing "acl tears." this should be correlated with the patient's symptoms. If an acl tear is present in an "older" patient try treating the patient with an initial conservative course including brace and pt. Read more...