10 doctors weighed in:

Can a corneal transplant be a good way to treat a congential cataract?

10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Sandra Lora Cremers
Ophthalmology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Corneal Transplant C

Sometimes congential cataracts can be associated with an abnormal cornea requiring a Corneal Transplant.
But a corneal transplant treats corneal anomalies and not cataracts, which require lens removal and an implant or contact lens after surgery.

In brief: Corneal Transplant C

Sometimes congential cataracts can be associated with an abnormal cornea requiring a Corneal Transplant.
But a corneal transplant treats corneal anomalies and not cataracts, which require lens removal and an implant or contact lens after surgery.
Dr. Sandra Lora Cremers
Dr. Sandra Lora Cremers
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Dr. Stephen Hamilton
Ophthalmology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Not specifically

Corneal transplants are done most commonly for corneal scarring, swelling, or ectasias.
Unless one of these conditions is present along with the congenital cataract, a corneal transplant should not be necessary.

In brief: Not specifically

Corneal transplants are done most commonly for corneal scarring, swelling, or ectasias.
Unless one of these conditions is present along with the congenital cataract, a corneal transplant should not be necessary.
Dr. Stephen Hamilton
Dr. Stephen Hamilton
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Dr. Jay Bradley
Ophthalmology - LASIK Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

A congential cataract is treated with cataract removal.
A corneal transplant treats corneal disease and would not correct a congenital cataract unless this is removed at the same time. If the cornea is clear, only the cataract would need to be removed.

In brief: No

A congential cataract is treated with cataract removal.
A corneal transplant treats corneal disease and would not correct a congenital cataract unless this is removed at the same time. If the cornea is clear, only the cataract would need to be removed.
Dr. Jay Bradley
Dr. Jay Bradley
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Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology

In brief: No

This will not affect the cataract.
The cornea is the surface of the eye (the winshield). A catarct is inside the eye.

In brief: No

This will not affect the cataract.
The cornea is the surface of the eye (the winshield). A catarct is inside the eye.
Dr. Michael Ham
Dr. Michael Ham
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