11 doctors weighed in:
How do a shy person and a person with autism differ?
11 doctors weighed in

Dr. Kek-Khee Loo
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral
8 doctors agree
In brief: Quite the opposite
A shy person has an intuitive understanding of social cues and social implications of language (may include subtle gestures and tone of voice).
The shy person experiences unease in social situations, which may lead to behaviors of avoidance (e.g. Averting eye gaze). In contrast, a person with autism is not readily attuned to social and language cues. The social withdrawal is not intentional.

In brief: Quite the opposite
A shy person has an intuitive understanding of social cues and social implications of language (may include subtle gestures and tone of voice).
The shy person experiences unease in social situations, which may lead to behaviors of avoidance (e.g. Averting eye gaze). In contrast, a person with autism is not readily attuned to social and language cues. The social withdrawal is not intentional.
Dr. Kek-Khee Loo
Dr. Kek-Khee Loo
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Dr. Carla Enriquez
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: A lot
Social impairment/communication difficulties/repetitive and stereotyped behaviors are the core symptoms of autism.
A shy person may not look you in the eyes, but will show none of the other core symptoms. The social impairment in a shy or anxious youngster is demonstrably much less than in an autistic child.

In brief: A lot
Social impairment/communication difficulties/repetitive and stereotyped behaviors are the core symptoms of autism.
A shy person may not look you in the eyes, but will show none of the other core symptoms. The social impairment in a shy or anxious youngster is demonstrably much less than in an autistic child.
Dr. Carla Enriquez
Dr. Carla Enriquez
Thank
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