6 doctors weighed in:

Is it possible for a vaccinated child to be carrying chicken pox and give it to an unvaccinated person?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Both are possible

Because vaccines are not 100% effective, occasionally a vaccinated child gets a case of real chicken pox (not from the vaccine) and could pass it to an unvaccinated, non-immune person.
Once in a while, a child who got the vaccine a few days ago can have some skin bumps containing the vaccine chicken pox virus, and could pass that virus to a non-immune person, who would be getting a "free vaccine".

In brief: Both are possible

Because vaccines are not 100% effective, occasionally a vaccinated child gets a case of real chicken pox (not from the vaccine) and could pass it to an unvaccinated, non-immune person.
Once in a while, a child who got the vaccine a few days ago can have some skin bumps containing the vaccine chicken pox virus, and could pass that virus to a non-immune person, who would be getting a "free vaccine".
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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Dr. Evelyn Hurvitz
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Very rarely.

You can only be contagious with chicken pox if you actually have the infection.
People vaccinated against chicken pox have about a 90% chance of being immune. If someone was vaccinated and didn't become immune, that person could get infected with the chicken pox and then pass it on.

In brief: Very rarely.

You can only be contagious with chicken pox if you actually have the infection.
People vaccinated against chicken pox have about a 90% chance of being immune. If someone was vaccinated and didn't become immune, that person could get infected with the chicken pox and then pass it on.
Dr. Evelyn Hurvitz
Dr. Evelyn Hurvitz
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