What happens to a tooth with a cavity that doesn't get a filling?

Serious stuff! It will continue to decay, leaving less and less tooth structure available to repair or salvage it. You will likely need root canal therapy and\or a crown if you wait too long or if there is already extensive caries present. Even worse would be the need to have the tooth extracted if it is un-repairable. Eventually it will cause an infection that can spread to other parts of your body.
Toothache or worse. Certain bacteria in everyone's mouth digest carbohydrates and produce acids. These acids cause a loss of minerals from tooth, which softens them. This is decay. Left unchecked, these bacteria infect nerve in tooth, and can cause toothache. Tooth may break (enamel shell is brittle and depends on inner portion [dentin] for support). Pain, expensive repair, or tooth loss occurs if no treatment.

Related Questions

If you have one cavity can you get a filling at when the dentist do the filling can they give you braces that same day?

Technically yes.. .. but practically speaking, probably not. Your orthodontist does not restore teeth, and if your general dentist is placing the appliances, it would most likely be done after all of your restorative treatment has been completed. You should ask the dentist that is treating you. Read more...
Of course. Complete your restorative procedure (filling) in the morning and get your braces afternoon. Do not forget to bring your parents with you to sign informed consent. Take care. Read more...
Complex. Depends on location of cavity and type of restoration required. i know you're trying to simplify your life, but attempting to do both procedures simultaneously may complicate treatment. In any event, Orthodontic Specialists do not do fillings,ply Orthodontic Treatment. Although some General Dentists do Orthodontic Treatment, there are level-of-care issues. Read more...

I have to replace a crown and get a filling for a cavity. Which one should I get done first?

Both. The extent of the problem in each will determine which one is more important to do. Your own dentist can answer that question better than we can never having seen either tooth nor x-rays of them. If money is an issue consider at least having the crown removed to evaluate the tooth, and then temporized with a good fitting strong temporary crown. Read more...
Dental Needs. Good day; Simple areas of decay are usually a priority in offering restorative dentistry to a patient. Unless the crown is loose or a considerable amount of decay may cause the crown to require immediate treatment. Read more...
The worst one. Let your Dentist make that decision with you. You treat the worst problem, the greater infection, first. Read more...

I get a dull pain sensation in the area right by a filling of the same tooth. Do I have a cavity?

Need exam. There is no way to diagnose your symptoms over the internet without actually seeing you and an x-ray of your tooth. It could be many things, or nothing at all. See your dentist to determine what's going on. Read more...
Possibly. It could be recurrent decay, a crack, gum inflammation, or several other less common problems. Don't wait to see your dentist. Treating now may prevent a larger problem later. Read more...

Is a cavity in a baby tooth worth filling? My daughter is 8 and losing most of her baby teeth. She has a cavity in one that will probably fall out soon. Do I need to get this filled? I don't want to cause her any more pain than I have to..

Several . Several factors come into play here. The age of the child, which tooth, the amount of decay in the tooth, can the tooth be restored. The only way to answer the question is to see you pediatric dentist for an exam. If you are sure the tooth is ready to fall out, it is probably a good idea to have pediatric dentist remove it before symptoms develop. Read more...
It . It depends on how deep the cavity is and how soon the tooth will fall out. Sometimes the answer is obvious and at other times it is not as clear cut. She might be in more pain from the cavity if left, rather than the dental procedure to repair it. Your dentist would be the best one to answer that question for you. Read more...
It . It is best to see a pedodontist or a dentist. I would find out when the permanent tooth underneath it is coming out. You want to refrain from removing a baby tooth because it is simply cheaper. If a baby tooth comes out too early it will allow for the rest of the teeth to move and cause malalignment as your child jaw grows and that will have its own issues to deal with later. Good luck. Read more...
Baby teeth. Active cavity in the mouth is not a good thing. It can "infect" other teeth. Even if the tooth is expected to be in the mouth for a short period of time still its cavity should be somehow addressed. The options are: 1. Caries removal + temporary filling 2. Caries removal + regular filling 3. Extraction + space maintainer (to prevent pathologic migration of the existing teeth). Read more...
Sometimes. Depending on the size of the cavity and the realistic time frame it will take lose this tooth will determine if you should correct the cavity or not. If the baby tooth will be gone in a month or so it should be fine to leave it as is. If it will be longer or the cavity can possibly damage other teeth, then it should be fixed. Read more...
Fill the tooth! Some baby teeth are meant to stay in a child's mouth until about age 10 or 11. If the tooth you are referring to is one of those teeth, it is maintaining the space for that adult tooth. That is why it should be filled. In addition, in today's world of dental medicine, a filling should not cause any pain! see your dentist to determine when that tooth should be falling out. Than make your decision. Read more...
Contagious! Since an adult tooth is growing underneath the decayed baby tooth, if untreated the adult tooth gets infected by the same cavity-causing bacteria and can become decayed even before coming in. Same for other teeth in the mouth. It is critical that you treat (or remove, if not treatable) all decay, and keep home care to prevent future decay. Your girl needs a healthy set of adult teeth to be well. Read more...
Best to be seen. By her dentist asap. If the tooth is almost ready to fall out and the decay very extensive, the dentist might recommend extracting it versus filling it. Only an examination and x-ray can determine the best treatment option. Hope this helps. Read more...