What is the likelihood of breast cancer if it runs within the family?

Usually 2. First degree relatives warrants a genetic work where a formal family pedigree is done, as well as genetic testing forknown molecular risks: brca i and ii. When you worry, ask to be referred for genetic testing and counseling.
High. One of the most significant risk factors for developing breast cancer is a family history of breast cancer. This is increased with first degree relatives with breast cancer ie sister or mother or father the brca gene mutation can be passed to a person from a mother or father and can increase the lifetime risk of developing breast cancer up to 85%.

Related Questions

Breast cancer runs on my fathers side of the family what are my chances of getting breast cancer?

Hard to say. Because breast ca is so common, it is very likely that someone, e.g. You, has relatives with breast ca without having hereditary breast cancer. Less than 10% of breast cancers are hereditary. Unless you have 1st degree relatives with breast or ovarian cancer your lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 10. Most of that risk occurs much later in life. Read more...
Hereditary Breast CA. ~85% of all breast cancers are environmental in origin. Of the hereditary type, we know most about the brca mutations, which can be passed on in a maternal or paternal pattern. Ask your family members who had breast cancer if they were "brca tested". If they were and are brca+, i advise you to see a genetic counselor to understand your specific risks. Read more...
Counseling. You should speak with a genetic counselor to assess your risk and to perform genetic testing if appropriate. Read more...

Am I at a high risk for if breast cancer runs in my family?

Depends. Most women diagnosed with breast cancer do not have a fam hist. With your history, genetic counseling & testing must be considered to educate you & your family/children, consider earlier screening & screening for other cancer as well. Read more...
Possibly. Cancer risk factors include: being female, increasing age, genetics, family history of breast cancer, previous breast cancer, being Caucasian, dense breast tissue, some previous benign breast conditions, never having given birth or 1st child after age 30, early menarche, late menopause, radiation (chest), exposure to Diethylstilbestrol, hormone replacement after menopause, oral contraceptives > Read more...

Breast cancer runs in my family and im paranoid about it. What are the symptoms that I should be aware of?

See a doctor. Early breast cancer will have no symptoms. Later breast cancers will present as a hard, firm, painless breast lump. Yearly mammogram after age 40, and sooner if there are concerning findings at your doctor's exam. Have yearly breast physical exams with your doctor. Also genetic testing can be performed if you are concerned. Read more...
See below. You do not need to be paranoid but you should acquire the knowledge that will help you. Learn about breast self examination and follow the guidelines which your family doctor can provide. Have an annual clinical examination by your gynecologist or primary care doctor. If there is any lump in the breast ask for a mammogram which is advised to be done annually once you get close to 40 years of age. Read more...
Awareness. Don't be paranoid but be aware. If your family history is truly significant, you should visit with a health professional with expertise on risk assessment. You may be ok with routine screening or may need closer surveillance. One size does not always fit all. Good luck. Read more...

If breast cancer runs in your family are you more prone to ovarian cancer?

Yes, if gene present. There is a specific gene that can be tested to see if you have a susceptibility to breast, ovarian or colon cancer. Read more...

I want to start going on tanning beds but breast cancer runs in my family, could this trigger it?

Not that I know... But tanning can increase your risk of melanoma, which can be even more virulent. This may be especially true if there is a brca mutation in your family which increases your risk for breast and ovarian cancer and also for melanoma. Nice as a tanned body may look (and i would not argue with that) it does so as a response to injury. My advise: don't do it. Read more...

Breast cancer runs in the family, would it be a good choice to consider taking out the real breasts and get implants or will the cancer still take over?

Geneticist. Some patients with very high risk for cancer can benefit of preventative mastectomies although to be truthful, you do not reduce the risk to 0. Before you think about that, i advise you visit a specialist with expertise in risk assessment and genetics who will estimate your risk, maybe order genetic tests, and go over your risk-reduction options. Best 2u. Read more...

Too young for a mammogram? Breast cancer runs in my family, and I'm really concerned about my own health. I'm only 17 - is it too early to get a mammogram?

Yes, . Yes, it is too early for you to get a mammogram. At this age, focus on self breast exams and familiarize yourself with the way your breasts feel so that you can notice if a lump develops in the future. Mammograms in young females are often extremely difficult to interpret because the breast tissue is so dense it hides most lesions. Screening for breast cancer using mammography starts at age 40. If you have a sister or mother who were diagnosed with breast cancer when they were younger than 50 years of age, then screening with breast MRI and genetic testing may be indicated. Read more...
Most likely yes. Mammograms become less accurate in women below forty and typically an ultrasound is the first imaging technique used. But there may be times when a physician will order a mammogram on a younger person. The important thing is to maintain regular follow-up with your primary care so your risk can be accessed and appropriate screening can be initiated. Read more...
Yes. 17 is probably too young. If you are concerned about an area, you may consider an ultrasound. Generally i recommend that women with a family history start getting mammograms 5 to 10 years younger than the when the family member was diagnosed with breast cancer, or age 40; whichever comes first. Read more...
It is too young. for a screening mammogram, but not too young for a risk profile if you have a strong family history. Has anyone in your family been tested for the BRCA gene? Sometimes screening begins in the 20s for BRCA carriers or other very high risk individuals. Read more...

Should I get a genetic test if breast cancer runs in my family in aunts and cousins?

Test them first. In general, we look most closely at first-degree relatives (mom, sister, daughter), but it is still pertinent, especially if they are young. It is always best to have the members of your family who have had breast cancer get the brca test first. If they are brca(+), you can get tested for that specific mutation at a much lower cost; if they are(-), your family can feel comfortable about their risks. Read more...
Depends. First find a genetic counselor or a high risk breast specialist. They can assess your risk. A lot depends on the number of second order relatives, their ages at diagnosis, whether any were bilateral - and any other cancers in your family -especially ovarian, colon, or uterine. The office visit is not too expensive, but the actual test is. Read more...
Genetic testing. Perhaps, yes. But, before you do the test, you should have a detail discussion re - what is your risk for certain cancers-, what kind of genetic testing needed, how to interprete the result , what the consequencies of the test are etc- those above are things you should discuss either wih your oncologist or with a genetic counsellor. Discuss with your oncologist in detail. Read more...