4 doctors weighed in:

Why would a peripheral nerve injury cause loss of both sensory and motor functions?

4 doctors weighed in
2 doctors agree

In brief: Injury location

Although specific sensory branches go to skin and motor branches go to muscle, the main nerve trunks contain both.
These large cables split off smaller branches that contain only sensory or motor nerve cells. If an injury occurs on the skin, sensantion nearby is affected. If a small motor nerve is injured, nearby muscles are paralyzed. But if a large nerve is injured, both can occur.

In brief: Injury location

Although specific sensory branches go to skin and motor branches go to muscle, the main nerve trunks contain both.
These large cables split off smaller branches that contain only sensory or motor nerve cells. If an injury occurs on the skin, sensantion nearby is affected. If a small motor nerve is injured, nearby muscles are paralyzed. But if a large nerve is injured, both can occur.
Dr. Michael McGonigal
Dr. Michael McGonigal
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Dr. Daniel Mass
Surgery - Hand Surgery

In brief: Combined nerve funct

The major peripheral nerves have both sensory and motor fibers.
An injury to the nerve will cause loss of function to both the sensory and motor aspect innervated by that nerve. Your nerve needs to be evaluated by a hand surgeon if in the arms.

In brief: Combined nerve funct

The major peripheral nerves have both sensory and motor fibers.
An injury to the nerve will cause loss of function to both the sensory and motor aspect innervated by that nerve. Your nerve needs to be evaluated by a hand surgeon if in the arms.
Dr. Daniel Mass
Dr. Daniel Mass
Thank
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