Related Questions

Would restless leg syndrome be a muscle disorder or a disorder of the nervous system?

Movement Disorder. Evidence shows that the disorder is related to problems with the dopaminergic circuits in the basal ganglia. The basal ganglia is intimately involved in the motor system and hence called the extrapyramidal system. Read more...
Rarely. There are many causes including venous insufficiency as well as vitamin and mineral deficiencies - including iron deficiencies. It is rarely an underlying muscular or neurologic disorder. Read more...
Central Nervous Prob. Though there are many associations of conditions such as iron deficiency, vascular insufficiency, and neuropathy the truth is we are now of the belief more than ever that RLS is primarily a central nervous derangement. As such it classifies as a form of movement disorder of central origin. Read more...

Can restless leg syndrome cause weakness of specially calve muscles and can it contribute low energy levels for daily life activities? What is the Rx

Restless leg. Restless leg syndrome (RLS) can be associated with such symptoms, although the actual muscle weakness on exam (not just by symptoms) is unlikely. See your doctor if the diagnosis hasn't been confirmed. If it has, iron supplementation (ferrous sulfate) usually is rapidly effective (a few days) in relieving symptoms. Sometimes, but not always, there is also iron deficiency anemia. Read more...

Have a sudden movement in my calf muscle at times in the night mostly cause? Restless leg syndrome?

Maybe maybe not. Could be restless leg, muscle strain, muscle fatigue, electrolyte imbalance, dehydration, etc. Read more...
RLS...maybe. RLS is a common, terribly bothersome, sleep disruption that has unclear causes in most cases. Nocturnal recumbency leg cramps, on the other hand actually hurt("Charlie horse cramp"), whereas RLS gives the sensation one just MUST move the leg/legs. Rarely, electrolyte imbalance can mimic RLS. Interestingly, some anti-Parkinson's disease meds at low doses, are highly effective for RLS. Read more...
Muscle. Involuntary movements in muscle can be cramps, fasciculation, fibrillation or myoclonic jerks and may or may not indicate pathologic conditions like calcium or magnesium deficiency or neuromuscular disease. If you have concerns about frequent muscular involuntary movements, consult a neurologist who will order any appropriate tests if needed. Read more...

Does massage treatment help restless leg syndrome?

Yes. There are many approaches that help rls. Massage of legs is reported by many patients as relieve prior to bedtime. I do noted that excessive massage of legs can distract from falling asleep. Botten line: if it helps, use it, if it's excessive talk to your doctor about treatment alternatives. Read more...
It may. A variety of integrative (or cam) techniques, including massage, acupuncture, acupressure, a variety of herbal remedies have people giving testimonials about how well they work. However, I have not been able to find randomized controlled trials that put these claims to the test. That being said, massage is certainly a technique that could not hurt, and may at least temporarily give some relief. Read more...

How can one treat restless leg syndrome?

Help. I refer quite a few people to www.Rls.Org and www.Rlshelp.Org. Behavioral treatments are first line, including avoiding medications know to worsen and ruling out medical issues that can cause. Then there are a number of medications that a doctor can prescribe. Read more...

How do I deal with restless leg syndrome?

Restless leg. Several remedies are available. Best to see a neurologist for evaluation & treatment. Read more...