I'm young and active. Is surgery a better option than pt for 6/10 low back pain?

No. Technically surgery is never the better option...Unless there is urgent nerve injury as in a herniated disc, tumor or accident. Acupuncture can help immensely as can physical therapy, proper body mechanics, good diet, etc. I have seen patients with a 9/10 back pain have relief to 2/10 in one hour from acupuncture. Proper stretching is also a must.
Never a first choice. Ueas your low back pain is caused by a problem which is a surgical emergency, surgery should never be a first choice. Your body has an inherent ability to heal. Let it. If conservative treatment (pt, home exercise, nsaid, ice/heat, activity modification) fail, the surgery will still be there waiting. Talk to your doc about the best options.
Back pain. Depends completely on the cause of the pain. In general the conservative non-surgical approach is preferred.

Related Questions

I'm 5'1" & weigh 250 lbs, not over eating, under. Is weight loss surgery a good option? Chronic lower back pain=hard to exercise, weight hurts back

If you are really. 7 years old, you should not be on HealthTap. If you are older, you MUST be overeating to weigh 250 pounds. If you do not have a medical condition, such as hypothyroidism, that can be treated -- you need intensive education in caloric restriction, increased physical activity and weight reduction. Read more...

Had low back pain for ten years, over last year it has been constant and gets worse with activities. Time for surgery?

Not necessarily. You need to start by seeing a physician. There are many causes of low back pain. Most cases of mechanical low back pain (even chronic pain) can be treated conservatively. Read more...
No. Surgery is considered for back pain if you have cauda equina syndrome, which is pain radiating from your back down your leg to your toes, accompanied by numbness, weakness, muscle loss, diminished reflexes and problems controlling urine, or if you have imaging documented spinal instability or compression of the spinal cord or nerve roots (spinal stenosis). Non-radiating back pain doesn't qualify. Read more...
Time for surgery. If the pain is severe and you can no longer tolerate it than surgery may be an option. Pure mechanical back is an indication for spinal surgery. If your orthopaedic spine surgeon can identify the source of your pain be it the disc, facet joint etc....Than a fusion is an excellent surgical option if done correctly. 'you don't have to have just neurological deficits for surgical intervention. Read more...

I'm a 80 year whit severe low back pain after apsudartrosis that followeherniated disk whit no chances for repeated surgery how treating pain?

Back pain. I understand there are a number of board certified pain management specialists available. They should be able to arrive at solution that will help. Read more...
You really should . First get a second opinion from an orthopaedic spine surgeon or neurosurgeon. Then, you should see a pain management specialist if the second opinions did not recommend any further surgical intervention. Read more...

Since having a two level acdf in october I am having low back pain. I have stenosis in the area. Could this flare up be the result of surgery?

Back pain after surg. The symptoms are probably from less activity with the arthritis acting up. Try some easy core stretches and heat or ice. Medications such as Ibuprofen or naprosyn (naproxen) can affect your neck fusion so consult your surgeon before taking this class of drug. Discomfort will usually improve as your activity increases. Read more...
Unlikely . Your acdf is unlikely to be related to your back pain issue. However often people with cervical disease have similar finding in the lumbar spine. It's worth speaking to your spinal surgeon about if symptoms persist. Read more...

Low back pain. 8 mos post laminectomy. Need good lower back strengthening exercises. Pain dr. Claims says its bio mech changes in facets post surgery?

It could be facet. Pain, but often during laminectomies they obliterate the medial branch that feeds the facet, so it is not the only possibility and other things, like post-laminectomy syndrome, should be considered. A diagnostic block of the medial branch can be an easy way to find out if those small nerves are causing the pain or not. Pt should still be in the discussion as well. Read more...
Core. I would recommend formal physical therapy if not done recently. Granted it's time consuming but having someone observe your technique and plan for increasing your program intensity is valuable. Main home core programs should be discussed with your surgeon. They include front plank, side plank, (goal for >1minute planks) hamstring stretching. I would avoid sit ups, dead lifts, squats. Read more...
Could be anything. Many things can cause pain after surgery. Scar tissue, re-herniation, facet disease, weak muscles etc... Recommend start with the basic stuff like working your core and pt and if that does not help consider repeat MRI first before attempting other options that pain doc suggests. Read more...
Possibly. There is nothing about a laminectomy that should precipitate facet pain/arthritis. But patietns with spinal stenosis who require laminectomy often have multiple back issues including facet arthritis. There could be scarring after surgery causing some pain but typically you would have some leg pain as well. After completing pt and core exercises, facet pain can easily be tested with an injeciton. Read more...