11 doctors weighed in:

What are the causes of palatal tori? Can that be associated to oral cancer?

11 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gary Sandler
Dentistry
4 doctors agree

In brief: Torus Pallatinus

Palatal tori are bony enlargements occurring in the midline of the hard palate in about 20% of the population.
They are just developmental areas of benign excess bone and pose absolutely no relationship to the development of oral cancer in any way.

In brief: Torus Pallatinus

Palatal tori are bony enlargements occurring in the midline of the hard palate in about 20% of the population.
They are just developmental areas of benign excess bone and pose absolutely no relationship to the development of oral cancer in any way.
Dr. Gary Sandler
Dr. Gary Sandler
Thank
Dr. Thomas Stelmach
Dentistry - Cosmetic
3 doctors agree

In brief: Not Cancer

Palatal tori are mostly a genetic issue.
15% of the population have them. They are exacerbated by clenching and grinding your teeth. There is no correlation to oral cancer.

In brief: Not Cancer

Palatal tori are mostly a genetic issue.
15% of the population have them. They are exacerbated by clenching and grinding your teeth. There is no correlation to oral cancer.
Dr. Thomas Stelmach
Dr. Thomas Stelmach
Thank
Dr. Matthew Darbro
Dentistry
3 doctors agree

In brief: Tori Are Normal

Palatal tori, and mandibular tori are a variation of normal.
They are not associated with any disease. A regular dental exam including radiographs, a careful soft tissue exam is important two times a year to screen for oral cancer. There are new technologies that i employ in my office that shines a light that can catch oral cancer at it's earliest stages. Palatal tori are a variation of normal.

In brief: Tori Are Normal

Palatal tori, and mandibular tori are a variation of normal.
They are not associated with any disease. A regular dental exam including radiographs, a careful soft tissue exam is important two times a year to screen for oral cancer. There are new technologies that i employ in my office that shines a light that can catch oral cancer at it's earliest stages. Palatal tori are a variation of normal.
Dr. Matthew Darbro
Dr. Matthew Darbro
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Dr. Alex Shvartsman
Dentistry - Cosmetic
2 doctors agree

In brief: Normal

Tori are normal bony growths on the plate or the lower jaw.
They are not cancer so don't worry. They tend to get larger with age. Unless they interfere with your daily functions there is no reason to remove them. The surgery can be brutal.

In brief: Normal

Tori are normal bony growths on the plate or the lower jaw.
They are not cancer so don't worry. They tend to get larger with age. Unless they interfere with your daily functions there is no reason to remove them. The surgery can be brutal.
Dr. Alex Shvartsman
Dr. Alex Shvartsman
Thank
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