Would a valvuloplasty work on asymptomatic, severe aortic stenosis patient?

Temporarily. It would work temporarily but you wouldn't want to assume the risks of this procedure in an asymptomatic patient. Aortic valvuloplasty is largely considered palliative.
No. Aortic valvuloplasty is only a temporary measure. It is used for the patients with severe aortic stenosis who's hearts and bodies are too sick for surgery. The valvuloplasty is done in hopes of relieving the obstruction long enough for the patients to temporarily improve enough to then undergo valve replacement. A patient without symptoms would not need valvuloplasty done.

Related Questions

Could valvuloplasty work for patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis?

No. Valvuloplasty is used a "bridge" to surgery in patient who are 2 "sick" to tolerate surgery or it can be used as a palliative treatment. The only definitive treatment for aortic stenosis is surgical replacement or for high risk and inoperable patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (tavr) is available. If the patient is truly asymptomatic, close monitoring is necessary. Read more...
No. Valvuloplasty is used a "bridge" to surgery in patient who are 2 "sick" to tolerate surgery or it can be used as a palliative treatment. The only definitive treatment for aortic stenosis is surgical replacement or for high risk and inoperable patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (tavr) is available. If the patient is truly asymptomatic, close monitoring is necessary. Read more...
No. This is a temporizing measure for those too sick to undergo definitive treatment. In patients who can tolerate definitive therapy, it is unwise. It would be foolish to choose it. While some may be seduced by its less invasive nature, it is no match for the results archived by surgical treatment. Hope this helps. Read more...

Is valvuloplasty effective in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis patient?

Generally no. Truly asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis does not usually need surgical/percutaneous treatment. The treatment of choice there is diuretics and certain, but not all, antihypertensives. However, determining who is "truly" asymptomatic should be left to the cardiologist. In general however, aortic valvuloplasty does not have good outcome and is usually reserved for last resort. Read more...
Not good results. Also results are suboptimal and procedural risk is high. Read more...

I am a patient w/ severe aortic stenosis. Can I be stabilized long enough to travel for 8 hours and wait two weeks?

See your doctor. These symptoms can only be adequately diagnosed only after a thorough evaluation by your doctor. This may include labs and other satudies. Once all of the information is in, your doctor can let you know what's going on, and what to do to help you. Read more...
Depends. Depends on if you have symptoms or not. I would recommend you call your cardiologist and review how you are feeling with them and let them advise you. Read more...

Does xalerto help patients with aortic stenosis, helping this valve problem?

Nope. Aortic stenosis is, in simple form, limestone forming on the valve. Xarelto (rivaroxaban) is a systemic blood thinner, and while it can decrease blood clots, it cannot melt limestone. The only true treatment for aortic stenosis is surgery, to be used when the stenosis is severe enough. Statins have been studied extensively and showed initial promise but that didn't pan out. Read more...
No. Xarelto does not help or treat patients with aortic stenosis. The only treatment for aortic stenosis is surgical replacement. Read more...

Is atropine contraindicated in patient with aortic stenosis and left ventricular hypertrolhy?

Not that I am aware . Atropine is typically used in cardiac arrests to increase hear rate. I have used it in patients with aortic stenosis and left ventricular hypertrophy. Atropine is also used to conteract certain poisens especially nerve gases. Also in opthalmology. I am not surre of other reasons to use this drug. Read more...