Can obstructive sleep apnea cause dementia?

Yes. There have been recent studies linking osa with alzheimer's dementia. Sleep deprivation leads to an accumulation of amyloid in the brain - this has been associated with alzheimer's dementia. Chronic intermittend hypoxia is seen with osa and this is a risk factor for dementia. Osa is associated with stroke as well.
Possibly. Osa can cause chronic low oxygen in the blood and this can lead to vascular damage. It can definitely increase your risk of dementia.
Possible. Recent studies show a statistical relationship. Another reason to seek evaluation and treatment.

Related Questions

I'm 18 with chronic anxiety bad sleep apnea and always struggled getting sleep, my grandma got dementia at 55. Am I going to get dementia?

Don't lose sleep.. Insomnia alone is not causal of dementia, but long term use of hypnotics is. Ask a doctor to find non-hypnotic sleep aids for you. Also, rbd (rapid eye movement behavior disorder) in men is very associated with lewy body dementia. It's not insomnia, rather powerful dreaming, and not likely what your grandma suffered. So, get help with the anxiety & apnea, avoid hypnotics and try to rest easy! Read more...
Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea means that an individual is stopping breathing for at least 10 seconds. This means that the brain is being deprived of the oxygen it needs to function properly. Prolonged oxygen deprivation can cause many problems, including dementia. Please see your physician and get treatment. Read more...
Highly unlikely. Just keep using your CPAP to protect your neurons. I am optimistic that there will be a cure, not just treatment for alzheimer's by the time you are 55 anyway:). Read more...
Unknown. It is important to get your sleep apnea treated, get regular exercise and eat a mediterranean type diet. Read more...

Can mild obstructive sleep apnea cause mild to moderate right ventricular enlargement? Normal function just enlarged. Left is normal

Causality; good fit. Without an actual examination, I cannot give specific medical advice on your particular health; what makes information better is how it fits: Strain from lung circulation: increased with obstruction (cigs and sleep apnea). Produces strain on heart shown by conduction system and RIGHT heart strained/enlargement. All Fits Together. but cannot say in your particular case. Read more...
RVH. it definitely can; you should a see a sleep specialist for an official evaluation to determine the severity of your sleep apnea and treatment to avoid future problems. Read more...
Sleep apnea. Hello. Right heart enlargement with normal function may be an early sign of pulmonary congestion or hypertension. This can occur with sleep apnea. Work on correcting the sleep apnea by following your sleep specialists recommendations, Read more...

Can mild obstructive sleep apnea cause rv enlargement in the heart?

Yes. This is one of the reasons why sleep apnea should be treated since it can lead to ride sided heart failure. If treated right ventricular enlargement and heart failure can be prevented. Read more...
Not if really mild. You're a 25 year old man and if you're either reasonably athletic or a little bit fat, you're perfectly entitled to have a big right ventricle. Do everything you can to get that sleep apnea managed. Try to make some life / attitude adjustments so that you won't be trapped by anxiety -- your physician's a great guide here. You may never find the cause of the heart block. Best wishes. Read more...
Sleep apnea risk. Any diagnosis of sleep apnea is a risk factor for strain on the heart and its demand for oxygen rich blood transport. How bad your sleep apnea is will determine how quickly you develop problems with your heart and it related organ systems. Read more...

Can obstructive sleep apnea cause a mild right heart enlargement? With everything else normal on the echo. Just slightly enlarged but I have osa...

Yes. Sleep apnea, if untreated, can cause right heart pressure to go up and eventually cause enlargement. Make sure that you are following up with your doctor's treatment plan. . Read more...
Yes. The short answer is - yes. Obstructive sleep apnea is a cause of enlargement of the right side of the heart. This is why treating OSA is so important! Mild enlargement is not a concern but it needs to be followed over time with repeat ECHO. Read more...

Can you die from obstructive sleep apnea? What causes death? Is it preventable? What test do you need to have run on you?

Obstructive . Obstructive sleep apnea is a chronic condition that is tough on your body. It happens when your airway closes off as you sleep causing disrupted sleep, snoring and fatigue and sleepiness the next day. Osa causes early mortality due to the chronic low oxygen levels at night and causes heart and lung disease and contributes to memory problems. It is diagnosed in a sleep clinic where you check in at night, sleep in their bed with monitors on your arms, legs , head and chest for the night. If you have obvious osa they will often wake you and put a CPAP device on you to see if it helps you keep your airway open on that same night. Cpap is a device that you wear under your nose or on your face like a mask and it helps put continuous airway pressure to keep your airway from closing. Folks with osa describe feeling tired all the time "like I am walking through mud". They fall asleep at the wheel driving and get high blood pressure. The diagnostic test is easy and just takes one night to help decide if this is a problem for you. Read more...
People . People with obstructive sleep apnea have an airway that is more narrow than normal, usually at the nose, back of the nose (nasopharynx), base of the tongue, back of the throat or palate. When the pharyngeal muscles (muscles of the upper throat ) relax, the palate relaxes backwards which can obstruct the airway. Most people have enough space behind the tongue to take a breath without needing to pull the tongue forward. However, when obstructive sleep apnea patients are awake, the tongue needs to be active to pull the base of the tongue forward to open the airway. During deep sleep, most muscles including the tongue muscles relax. Now, most people do not realize we don’t really need a full night sleep to be fully rested the next day. The really important part of sleep is the time we spend during deeper phases of sleep during which our bodies truly gets to relax itself. This part of our sleep may only take a few hours although in order to reach the deeper parts of our nightly sleep, we may require some superficial non relaxing type of sleep patterns. So, if you slept 8 hours one night but spent most of that sleep in a superficial type sleep, you may as well have been up watching your favorite show on tv because the next day you will be as tired. During the deep phase of sleep, also called rapid eye movement (rem) sleep, the muscles completely relax. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea often don't report actually waking up during the night with each episode of apnea. Frequently, during the apnea the brain only partially awakens from a deep sleep (stages 3, 4, or rem) to a shallow level of sleep. When the brain partially awakens to a more superficial phase of sleep, the tongue muscle contracts and pulls the tongue forward so that a breath can be taken. The patient may remain asleep, but the deep sleep that is important to be fully rested the following day is disrupted. Obstructive sleep apnea (osa) may be a risk factor for the development of other medical conditions. High blood pressure (hypertension), heart failure, heart rhythm disturbances, atherosclerotic heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, Insulin resistance, and even death are some of the known complications of untreated obstructive sleep apnea. However, to keep the range of adverse effects of sleep apnea more realistic and perhaps less dramatic, the chances of actually dying from sleep apnea is slim. It is the morbidity, the cumulative ill effect on the body that sleep apnea has which is the reason for selecting to treat it in the first place. The first evaluation of sleep apnea is by obtaining a full history of symptoms to understand the effect sleep apnea may have on various body systems. Also, your doctor can understand the source of apnea whether from direct obstruction of the airway or a problem that occurs in the central nervous system (the brain). A physical examination can reveal a lot of information beginning in the most common cause of sleep apnea which is being overweight (weight loss is directly related to reduction and prevention of sleep apnea) to various factors in the airway beginning with the nose, the nasal passageways, the back of the nose, the palate, the tonsils, the throat, and the width and thickness of the neck. Finally, to objectively assess the severity of sleep apnea, a sleep study or polysomnography is performed whereby you sleep in a room that resembles a hotel with the exception of a multitude of monitors that evaluate your heart rate, blood pressure, audio and video recording of your snoring, apneas, and body movement, recording of brain activity (electrodes), ekg (heart rhythm monitoring) and levels of oxygen in the blood. It is a painless test that is performed overnight. Diagnosis of sleep apnea may warrant treatment with weight loss, medication, a special nighttime oxygen mask (a treatment called cpap) or occasionally surgery to correct anatomical airway obstruction. Read more...
Indirectly . Death may come as a result of he sequelae of osa. Hypertension, stroke, and other cardiovascular disease have been shown to result from untreated osa. Whether you are treated with CPAP or surgery either will decrease the probability of death. Read more...
OSA sequelae. Read about it here: http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/sleep-apnea/sleep-apnea-conditions#1. Read more...

Does obstructive sleep apnea usually cause many symptoms?

Not necessarily. The number one daytime symptom of obstructive sleep apnea (osa) is sleepiness. Turns out that only about 20% of osa patients complain of sleepiness. Thus, the majoriy of osa patients may not subjectively perceive daytime symptoms. Overall, osa may be a sneaky creature which makes it imperative to actively seek for symptoms/predisposing factors. Read more...
Yes. Besides the daytime somnolence and lethargy, osa has been shown to increase risk of hypertension, stroke, and other cardiovasular disease. These issues in turn casue severe symptoms. These issues are detrimental to overall health and decrease lifespan. Read more...
Yes. Yes. A list here: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sleep-apnea/basics/symptoms/con-20020286. Read more...

What causes obstructive sleep apnea in children who already have their adenoids & tonsils out?

Tongue postion. The position of the tongue against the back of the throat is the most likely culprit. A diagnostic scan may be needed in addition to a thorough exam by a sleep apnea specialist is in order before treatment however. Read more...
Sleep apnea. Is your child in the normal weight catagory- if they are heavier or their body anatomy like a narrow palate or thick neck could cause a smaller airway that may be a factor. They may need orthodontia to help open the air way. Read more...
Just to name a few. Obesity, muscle tone problems, children with genetic diseases (e.g. Down syndrome), abnormal face and underbite (retrognatia). See a pediatrician for evaluation and tests. Read more...
Other areas. Other areas of obstruction. There can be many. Seek evaluation by a pediatric sleep doctor for assessmnt. Read more...

What can cause obstructive sleep apnea in children that already have their adenoids & tonsils out?

Other causes. An enlarged tongue, a retruded lower jaw, excess tissue in the soft palate, a deviated septum, enlarged nose turbinates or nasal polyps can all contribute to obstructive sleep apnes. Check with your doctor. Read more...
Small airway. Other constrictions to air can be the entire pathway of air. Both hard and soft tissues can be naturally small or narrow, creating decreased or even blocked flow. See your doctor for an evaluation. Read more...
Obesity. Obesity is the most common cause of persistent sleep apnea after tonsil and adenoid surgery in children. Read more...
Small lower jaw. The mandible (lower jaw) supports the forward suspension of the tongue muscles. If the mandible is hypoplastic (smaller than it should be, the tongue may be falling back at night and partially occluding the airway. Look at the profile of someone. The chin's furthest point forward should roughly allign with a spot above the upper lip/below the nose. Some kids have slow mandibular growth. Read more...
Other obstructions. Other airway blockage. Small jaw, large tongue, small air tubes. Have patient evaluated by sleep MD. Read more...

Can obstructive sleep apnea be caused by complications from psychiatric medications or dentist grinding of teeth which may change jaw face or tonguesi?

OSA. Obstructive sleep apnea is not influenced by minor dental adjustments . It can be affected by medications that are sedative like in nature. If you have sleep apnea, you should ask your doctor if your medications will affect your underlying condition. Most docs would be very receptive to your concerns and will help you with your questions. Good luck! Read more...
Maybe. Osa cannot be caused primarily from side affects from psychiatric medications alone yet may be modified by them to a certain degree. Bite adjustments by a dentist treatment does not to any significant degree change the jaw position or tongue space to the point of modifying an underlying osa condition. Work with your psychiatrist specialist on the best approach in minimizing this risk. Read more...
Medications yes, Mediations can cause muscle relaxation and allow the lower jaw and tongue to fall into the airway and increase the probability and severity of an airway blockage. Dental oculus sal adjustments are very unlikely to cause more apnea events. Read more...
Complex. Complex. Sleep problems can result in grinding of teeth and subsequent TMD. Psych meds can also result in teeth grinding. Read more...