8 doctors weighed in:

If anterior horn spinal nerves are motor, then epidural steroid inj's can only relieve sensory symptoms being injected posteriorly?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. Qamar Khan
Pain Management
3 doctors agree

In brief: Interesting Thought

The plan is for the epidural steroid injection that is done posteriorly (called interlaminar/translaminar epidural injection) to reach the anterior epidural space where both the motor and sensory nerves exit out.
Below the level of L2, roughly the spinal cord ends and all nerves exiting from the spine have both sensory/motor components.

In brief: Interesting Thought

The plan is for the epidural steroid injection that is done posteriorly (called interlaminar/translaminar epidural injection) to reach the anterior epidural space where both the motor and sensory nerves exit out.
Below the level of L2, roughly the spinal cord ends and all nerves exiting from the spine have both sensory/motor components.
Thank
Dr. Laurentiu Boeru
Anesthesiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Epidural

An epidural is done correctly the medicine surrounds the nerve roots coming out of the conjugation hole.
The roots are composed by a motor branch from the anterior horn, and a sensory branch from the posterior horn +/- sympathetic component from the lateral horn. The "steroid injection" reduces the local inflammation which reduces the pain. Can be combined with local anesthetic for prompt relief.

In brief: Epidural

An epidural is done correctly the medicine surrounds the nerve roots coming out of the conjugation hole.
The roots are composed by a motor branch from the anterior horn, and a sensory branch from the posterior horn +/- sympathetic component from the lateral horn. The "steroid injection" reduces the local inflammation which reduces the pain. Can be combined with local anesthetic for prompt relief.
Thank
Dr. Bojan Pavlovic
Anesthesiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Maybe

A far lateral approach to an interlaminar epidural has been shown to provide anterior spread and likely works as well as a transforaminal epidural injection.

In brief: Maybe

A far lateral approach to an interlaminar epidural has been shown to provide anterior spread and likely works as well as a transforaminal epidural injection.
Thank
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