6 doctors weighed in:
A few people mentioned eating local honeycomb and honey to help allergies. Is that a wives tale?
6 doctors weighed in

Jin Packard
Emergency Medicine
3 doctors agree
In brief: Can't hurt, no proof
If no harm in trying, why not? Some, not everyone, report improvements with "natural" remedies.
It may be a placebo effect. There is no peer-reviewed published evidence for honey and allergies. For seasonal (pollen) allergies, take appropriate antihistamines. If you have shell fish or bee sting allergies, always keep an epi pen on you. Don't substitute honey/combs in place of prescribed meds.

In brief: Can't hurt, no proof
If no harm in trying, why not? Some, not everyone, report improvements with "natural" remedies.
It may be a placebo effect. There is no peer-reviewed published evidence for honey and allergies. For seasonal (pollen) allergies, take appropriate antihistamines. If you have shell fish or bee sting allergies, always keep an epi pen on you. Don't substitute honey/combs in place of prescribed meds.
Jin Packard
Jin Packard
Answer assisted by Jin Packard, Medical Student
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Dr. Gary Steven
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes
The pollens to which you're allergic are very small, and blown around by the wind.
Flower pollen is too heavy to be blown by the wind, so you're not exposed to it, so you're not allergic to it, and flowers need to be brightly colored to attract bees to carry the pollen from one plant to the next. Thus, honey does not contain the pollens that make you sneeze, and therefore can't possibly help you.

In brief: Yes
The pollens to which you're allergic are very small, and blown around by the wind.
Flower pollen is too heavy to be blown by the wind, so you're not exposed to it, so you're not allergic to it, and flowers need to be brightly colored to attract bees to carry the pollen from one plant to the next. Thus, honey does not contain the pollens that make you sneeze, and therefore can't possibly help you.
Dr. Gary Steven
Dr. Gary Steven
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Dr. Ankush Bansal
Internal Medicine
In brief: No
Although not rigorously proven scientifically, conceptually it does make sense.
Honey contains trace amounts of pollen and contaminants in the air that cause allergies in some. So you get frequent small doses of the allergen when eating honey and the comb. That's how allergy desensitization therapy works. However, there may be harmful uncontrollable side effects with honey "therapy". Be careful.

In brief: No
Although not rigorously proven scientifically, conceptually it does make sense.
Honey contains trace amounts of pollen and contaminants in the air that cause allergies in some. So you get frequent small doses of the allergen when eating honey and the comb. That's how allergy desensitization therapy works. However, there may be harmful uncontrollable side effects with honey "therapy". Be careful.
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Dr. Ankush Bansal
Thank
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