7 doctors weighed in:

Should I worry about trembling eyelid? I am otherwise very health.

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Probably not

Trembling of an eyelid, which happens in normal people, is called myokymia (an involuntary, spontaneous, quivering of a few muscle cell bundles within a muscle).
Myokymia starts and stops spontaneously. In the eyelids, it can last a few minutes to a few days. One should see an ophthalmologist (md eye doctor) if such symptoms persist, keep recurring, or are combined with any other symptoms.

In brief: Probably not

Trembling of an eyelid, which happens in normal people, is called myokymia (an involuntary, spontaneous, quivering of a few muscle cell bundles within a muscle).
Myokymia starts and stops spontaneously. In the eyelids, it can last a few minutes to a few days. One should see an ophthalmologist (md eye doctor) if such symptoms persist, keep recurring, or are combined with any other symptoms.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
Thank
Dr. Stephen Hamilton
Ophthalmology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Twitch

No worry. This is very common and should resolve as quickly as it came, although it can take weeks.
If persistent or worsens, then i would have it assessed.

In brief: Twitch

No worry. This is very common and should resolve as quickly as it came, although it can take weeks.
If persistent or worsens, then i would have it assessed.
Dr. Stephen Hamilton
Dr. Stephen Hamilton
Thank
Dr. Glenn Pomerance
Ophthalmology

In brief: ? Infection of lids

Agree with dr. Kwok.
In my experience, such twitching my be the result of a low-grade infection caused by bacteria. Cleansing the lids with a product designed for the purpose, warm compresses ( to encourage better circulation and removal of stale tear oils), and lubrication of the dry eye may stop the annoyance. Antibiotic/anti-inflammatory drop medication, prescribed by an eyemd may be necessary.

In brief: ? Infection of lids

Agree with dr. Kwok.
In my experience, such twitching my be the result of a low-grade infection caused by bacteria. Cleansing the lids with a product designed for the purpose, warm compresses ( to encourage better circulation and removal of stale tear oils), and lubrication of the dry eye may stop the annoyance. Antibiotic/anti-inflammatory drop medication, prescribed by an eyemd may be necessary.
Dr. Glenn Pomerance
Dr. Glenn Pomerance
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Board Certified, Neurology
48 years in practice
55M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors