What are jaw surgery complications?

Many and few. Jaw surgery can cause certain short and long term complications. The most long term complication would be loss of sensation due to nerve trauma or nerves that have been severed. The overwhelmingly most common complication would be post-operative swelling. This is normal and usually easily controlled. Most surgeries turn out well, but a few are complicated by unwanted soft tissue changes. Check.
Many but. Many, but uncommon in the hands of a board certified oral & maxillofacial surgeon. Risks include Infection, bleeding, swelling, unsatisfactory cosmetic result, non healing of bones, anesthetic complications.

Related Questions

Are there any scary complications associated with jaw surgery?

Jaw surgery. All surgeries have complications and risks. It's very important to meet with your oral surgeon and discuss these risks and possible complications. Read more...
Complications. Risks and potential complications of jaw surgery are extensive but rare and not really scary. They include sensory nerve injury with resultant numbness of the skin of the face, damage to teeth with potential loss of one or more teeth, TMJ problems, failure of the bone to heal, malocclusion or bad bite requiring prolonged orthodontic treatment, need for additional surgery to remove hardware, etc. Read more...
Agree Dr. Bates. Plus possible complications associated with any surgery, such as bleeding and infection. Very rare, and with new "rigid fixation" your jaws don't have to be wired together anymore. Read more...
Dr. Bates list plus. I agree with Dr. Bates list. The way to minimize complications is to seek a very experienced surgeon. Usually in a geographic area one or a few surgeons do most of the corrective jaw surgery. Search around. The more experienced your surgeon, the lower the risk of significant complications. The best surgeons for this type of surgery are board certified oral & maxillofacial surgeons. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: jaw surgery?

Jaw surgery. The question is somewhat vague, but jaw surgery could be defined as surgery on the jaw. Could be upper or lower jaw. Could be reconstructive jaw surgery such as orthognathic surgery, which involves making bone cuts, or osteotomies, in the jaws to reposition them into a more harmonious relationship, and holding them in their new position with titanium plates and screws. Also jaw trauma or cancer. Read more...
Jaw surgery. Jaw surgery includes any procedure performed on the jaw such as: orthognathic surgery, tumor removal, grafting, reshaping. Read more...
As it sounds. Typically known as orthognathic surgery, it is surgical management of a jaw or jaws to correct function, health and esthetics of the jaws or facial relationships. It is typically and ideally done with orthodontic treatment. Read more...
Any surgery of jaw. Any surgery of the jaw. Cancer surgery, corrective (orthognathic), TMJ surgery, surgery for pathology,bone grafting. Jaw surgery specialist is oral surgeon. Read more...

What might lead to having jaw surgery and is it worth it?

Jaw surgery . Jaw surgery is designed to restore the proper bite and meshing of the teeth. In the long run this will preserve your teeth and lessen the chances of TMJ disfuntions and improve your breathing and maybe appearance. Having performed over 1700 procedures in my career I have had not one patient tell me they were not happy with the results. You need to find a very experienced surgeon. Read more...
Long term success. You are asking if there are benefits to jaw surgery. Long term success to avoid pain and malocclusion. The better alignment the better your bones and teeth will last. Imagine if every bite you take the left side has to work harder. Eventually the left wears out. Be well. Ask your surgeon for before and after photos. Read more...
Functional/cosmetic. Function - if you teeth/jaw don't fit. Better chewing function can improve. Cosmetic - underbite/overbite. Better facial balance. Pathological - cancer or other disease. Cure. See oral surgeon for expert advice. Read more...
Severe Malocclusion. If orthodontics cannot correct your malocclusion,then often the combination of surgery and orthodontics will. Primary benefit is functionality and long-term stability. Living longer,we must be able to chew to eat a healthy diet, speak properly and smile,well into our 90's. Correct the problem now and enjoy the benefits:function,stability,appearance,comfort.Oral Surgeon,Orthodontist,Prosthodontist. Read more...
Jaw SurgeryNecessary. indications: difficulty chewing, biting, or swallowing, speech problems, breathing problems, protruding jaw and chronic jaw pain. See your OMS for consultation and imaging. Read more...

Can somebody tell me how can having jaw surgery feel like?

Jaw surgery? You have supplied very little information in order to try to properly answer your question. There are many types of jaw surgery and the individual response to any treatment varies widely. This is something that you should personally discuss with your surgeon for any possible or planned surgery. Read more...
Vague question. There are many types of jaw surgery. The best approach would be to see an oral surgeon who can examine you, discuss options and the details about any surgery. Read more...

Is underbite jaw surgery 100% safe?

Mostly safe . Like any surgical procedure, jaw surgery carries a certain risk such as infection, bleeding and adverse reaction to anesthetic. The risk overall is not significant however compared with the benefits of correcting your underbite. Good luck! Read more...
No. Nothing is 100% safe, it a matter of risk to benefit ratio. Orthodontists (like me) and almost all health professionals look to the least invasive means for correction of problems. There maybe alternatives to surgery with an underbite, especially if it is not severe. While orthognathic surgery is invasive, it rarely produces unacceptable risks. Read more...
No. No surgical procedure is 100% free of potential complication. Your surgeon will go over the potential problems that may arise during or after the surgery. Read more...
Informed consent. Surgery of any type has associated risks. It is important to get a clear picture of the risks and benefits as part of complete informed consent with your oral surgeon and orthodontist. Read more...
No. No medical or dental procedure comes with a written guarantee. Any and all procedures carry some risk of complications and failure. Read more...
No. Like any surgery there is inherent risks. You are not 100% safe driving your car. Talk with an orthodontist and an oral surgeon and get all these questions answered. Read more...
Unanimous. It's unanimous - jaw surgery is not 100% safe. No surgery is 100% safe. In the hands of a board certified oral & maxillofacial surgeon, orthognathic surgery is very safe. Ask surgeon about risks. Read more...

Can I get jaw surgery to fix an under-bite?

Orthodontic consult. First-consult with the best orthodontist in your area. You may want to even get 2nd and 3rd opinions. There are many options, but only with a thorough and careful orthodontic workup can you get the answers that you deserve. Under certain conditions, there are surgical procedures that are used in conjunction with conventional orthodontics. Read more...
Yes. Orthognathic surgery is jaw surgery performed usually in conjunction with orthodontic treatment to correct a mismatch in the jaws related to a skeletal problem. A detailed examination and workup by an orthodontist, working together with a surgeon will result in a comprehensive treatment plan to properly correct your bite problem. Read more...
Yes, but. Yes, but depends on degree. Sometimes braces enough. See a competent orthodontist for evaluation and treatment options. If surgery indicated. make sure surgeon is a board certified oral & maxillofacial surgeon. Read more...

Could an underbite jaw surgery really hurt?

Prepare well. Your surgical team repeats this type of surgeries for many patients. They are very aware of post-surgery pain and how to help you with it. If you tend to do poorly after any trauma, letting your family and doctor know will be helpful. This prepares them well. In addition, it is good to prepare yourself well. Patients who know how to stay calm and relax heals better, and experience less pain. Read more...
Yes. Post surgical discomfort will normally accompany jaw surgery to correct and underbite. The amount of discomfort is related to the difficulty of the surgery, the technique of stabilization, and whether it was a one jaw or two jaw proceedure. As with all surgeries, it is important to ask these types of questions with the surgeon directly. Read more...
Surgery hurts. There's no getting around it. Much less problematic today than just a few years ago because of improvements in surgical techniques and medications. Sometimes there's no choice, it's the only way to resolve your problem. Having one jaw not match the other is like having one leg shorter than the other, eventually everything gets thrown off. Talk to BOTH qualified Orthodontic and Oral Surgeon. Read more...
Mild-moderate. Post op pain controlled quite well with prescribed narcotic pain medication. Ask you oral & maxillofacial surgeon for complete information pre and post op. Read more...

Could jaw surgery make my neck look longer?

No vertical length. When you get a jaw surgery that advances the lower jaw forward, it can make the "chin to throat distance" longer and enhance the appearance of a tight neck, long jaw line, and the youthful look. This may also give the appearance of a longer neck, but this does not make the neck vertically longer. That would require making you taller in the cervical spine and i'm not aware of such a surgery. Read more...
Illusion, yes. The neck can be given a sculpted look with the illusion of length by a submental liposuction or submentoplasty. Chin augmentation would enhance this effect. Also would get a similar result with a facelift. See an oral surgeon or facial plastic surgeon for advice. Read more...