How do you treat a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament?

Surgery. Anterior cruciate ligament disruption is best handled with surgery. In some cases where the knee is stable and the individual is skeletally immature a decision may be made to delay the surgery. Another situation where a non- surgical approach may be considered is again where the knee is stable an the individual is not very active or elderly. Seek expert advice from an orthopedic surgeon.
Acl reconstruction. Most often, an acl tear requires reconstruction with tissue from the patient's hamstrings or from the tissue bank. Some patients can get by without an acl. Start with physical therapy and soon you will know which category you fall into. If there is also a meniscus tear, reconstruction of the acl is necessary.
Surgery. Most ACL tears in active , younger individuals, require surgery, to stabilize the knee again. Non- surgical treatment is reserved for people who may be older and inactive, or, if they have other conditions that make them a poor candidate for surgery.

Related Questions

How do you treat an anterior cruciate ligament injury?

Reconstruct if torn. Most anterior cruciate ligament injuries that are complete tears end up being reconstructed by bringing in new tissue to rebuild the torn ligament and to hopefully return full function to the knee and injured patient. Read more...

How can you treat the ganglion cyst of anterior cruciate ligament?

Several options... Intra-articular cysts associated with the ACL can be treated with a variety of options. It the finding is incidental and asymptomatic, no treatment is necessary. If symptomatic, medications and physical therapy or an injection can be helpful. If symptoms persist or recur, arthroscopic cyst excision is also an option. Read more...
Observe vs excise. Ganglion cysts around or within the cruciate ligaments (acl & pcl) are not uncommon. The diagnosis can be made via an MRI or at the time of arthroscopy. Depending upon the location and size, the ganglion is deemed to be either incidental or symptomatic and responsible for the pain and perhaps loss of motion that may intermittently occur. Only symptomatic ones are excised/aspirated arthroscopically. Read more...
Surgery. See an orthopedic surgeon for consultation as this may involve structures of the knee. Read more...

What sort of problem is an anterior cruciate ligament (a.C.L.) injury?

Ligament sprain/tear. The acl is a ligament inside the knee that helps to keep the knee stable - keeps it from moving too far forward or backward. It works with the posterior cruciate ligament (pcl) to accomplish this. The acl is often injured when running or other fast movements when the lower leg is planted on the ground and the knee is bent and twisted. It can be a strain or sprain or a complete tear. Read more...
Knee instability. When you tear the acl, you lose one of the stabilizing ligaments in your knee. That can allow your knee to become unstable or shift with certain movements. A knee that keeps on shifting can wind up damaging other structures (the meniscus or articular cartilage). Some people can rehab their knee and may not need an acl reconstruction, while others will need a reconstruction even for daily activity. Read more...

What is done for an anterior cruciate ligament injury?

Immobilization. Initially one is treated non operatively with immobilization with velcro-type knee immobilizer. Graded range of motion then physical therapy. Read more...
Torn or sprained? It depends on if it was fully torn or sprained. If fully torn, may need arthroscopic acl reconstruction (surgery via 'scope'). If sprained, can rehab with physical therapy and use a knee brace. Read more...

How long should anterior cruciate ligament injury last?

Depends. If a complete acl tear is not surgically reconstructed, the injury never heals back together. Sometimes without surgery, patients have enough stability to function fairly well. Surgery is performed when indicated to reconstruct the torn ligament. Read more...

What are the tests for anterior cruciate ligament injury?

PE and MRI. The first step is checking for an acl injury is talking to the patient about their injury and doing a good physical exam of the knee (pe). At this point, most skilled doctors will have a strong suspicion that the acl is torn. X-rays are usually done to make sure there isn't a bad bone injury. Often a MRI is obtained to confirm the diagnosis and look for other, associated injuries. Read more...