Is surgery effective to treat obstructive sleep apnea?

Yes if Multi-Level . Multi-level surgery has been shown to be more effective than traditional methods. Depending on the severity of osa, treating the palate/tonsils in combination with the base of tongue and/or sinonasal obstruction is quite successful in reducing patient symptoms and osa severity. Latest minimally-invasive techniques has reduced pain. 50% success is based on old uppp-alone surgical data.
Surgery and OSA. There are some facts to keep in mind if you are considering surgery to help reduce your snoring or sleep apnea. There is no guarantee that surgery will resolve your symptoms. You may still need to use CPAP or an oral appliance to adequately control your symptoms.
Yes, depends. As long as the correct surgery is performed, it is very effective. Orthognathic surgery with maxillomandibular advancement is very effective (95% success rate based on several studies) with minimal post op pain. Other surgeries like the uppp are much less effective(less than 50%) and have severe post operative pain for extended periods of time.
Yes, but. Yes, but it must be directed at the source of the problem. Get surgical opinions from both ENT and Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons.

Related Questions

How do you feel about surgery for obstructive sleep apnea?

Depends. Surgery for osa is not the first option i would choose, but it depends on what surgical procedure is recommended and why. Surgical success for osa is not guaranteed, and the decision to proceed should be made with careful consideration for the risks, benefits, and alternative treatments available. Ask your surgeon about the success rates for each type of procedure and weigh your options. Read more...
Depends . Depends on how severe the sleep apnea is. If you are not satisfied with CPAP or the oral appliance and have tried weight loss programs with lifestyle and diet changes then consider surgery. However, surgery should be the last option. Read more...
Sleep apnea. If you are speaking of the upp that can be approximately 50 % successful for many types of apneas - how severe are you? Mild to moderate apneas can be treated with a dental appliance that will bring your jaw forward and open your airway at night. Read more...
Very beneficial. Very beneficial in selected cases. If your anatomy is amenable to surgical treatment, and you have trouble with non-surgical treatments, can work very well. Read more...

Is obstructive sleep apnea successfully treatedd by surgery?

Generally not. Depends on the surgery - uvulo-palato-pharyngo-plasty, involving removal of the uvula, and part of the back of the palate, along with removal of tonsils, helps thin patients with large tonsils. Otherwise it usually does not work. Maxillo-mandibular advancement (cutting both jaws and moving them forwards) works much better. Laser or radiofrequency surgeries or implants do not work well. Read more...
Depends . Depends on the patient, their anatomy, the severity of the apnea and location of obstruction during sleep. At best data shows surgery to be 50% effective in controlling apnea with CPAP nearly 100% effective. That being said, we still often will operate when the patient can't tolerate CPAP in hopes of curing apnea or at least making CPAP more tolerable or as an adjunct to dental appliances. Read more...
Depends. Based on long duration of observation for surgical approaches which are different types, the more commonly used surgeries is uppp, which is removing tonsils, part of soft palate and uvula, works in about 30% of cases. Bimaxillary osteotomy is a larger surgery as the 3rd step in surgical approach works 90-95% (from stanford university). Cpap with almost no side effects works near 100%. Read more...
Chosen well, it may. You might not want the surgery though or you may not be an ideal candidate. The surgery with the highest rate of success is an mma procedure. This stands for maxillo-mandibilar advancement. The success rate for a cure is 85%. It does involve surgically changing the alignment of both your upper and lower jaws, possibly changing your facial appearance. It is done to open up your airway. Read more...
Rarely... Most surgical procedures for osa deal with the palate--a component of apnea, but not the major problem. The surgeries that address the tongue (mma (jaw advancement) and genioglossus advancement hyoid myotomy) show better success, but have high risk. Surgery is my last resort. CPAP is the gold standard, oat (oral appliance therapy) is a fantastic, safe, and mostly reversible option. Read more...
Yea. Osa is diagnosed with clinical signs as well as a sleep study. (polysomnography). After clinical exam is perform your surgeon will discuss surgical options depending on severity of obstruction. Some procedures include septoplasty, uvuloplasty, base of tongue reduction and in more severe cases airport and lower jaw advancement. Read more...

Should I risk obstructive sleep apnea surgery?

Depends. Get a comprehensive consult from a sleep physician rather than a surgeon. There are several options for treatment of sleep apnea ranging from weight loss, cpap, dental devices and surgery; do not rush into an aggressive option without a second opinion. Read more...
Probably. I'm guessing you have been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea, and the question is whether the surgery is worth it. Those with obstructive sleep apnea have a higher rate of heart disease and heart failure, weight gain, decreased energy, and a host of other issues. The surgery itself is usually a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy, well known and low risk procedures, but not totally innocent. Read more...
Maybe. If you have really tried the nonsurgical options (ie cpap) then sleep apnea surgery can be appropriate and effective. The risk of the surgery itself depends on the exact procedure, skill of the surgeon, and your underlying health status. Read more...
Depends on severity. The ideal situation would be that surgery could fix all sleep apnea patients so they would not have to wear a machine or dental device. The reality is that while surgery works well for mild and even moderate sleep apnea, success is best achieved with a surgeon who has a lot of experience in this type of surgery. If you can't or won't wear a machine at night, surgery is surely worth the risk. Read more...
Last resort. If you've been properly diagnosed, what other solutions have you tried? There is CPAP of various types and mandibular advancement appliances, made by dentists. These approaches can be very effective, alone or in combination. Surgery is highly invasive, painful and not always successful. In addition, there is often surgical relapse, and you return to pre surgical condition. Last resort for me. Read more...
Which surgery?? "bimaxillary advancement, " that is, surgically moving the jaws (with the teeth and tongue attached) forward so that the base of the tongue is moved away from the throat tissues in the back--opening the airway, is a reasonably successful surgery--but risky! fortunately, there are other, safer methods. The CPAP is an "air" splint and dental devices are mechanical splints for use while sleeping. Read more...
Depends. Most sleep apnea surgery techniques are safe. Indications for surgery include intolerance of CPAP and oral appliances and a corrective anatomical problem. Discuss in detail with your sleep MD. Read more...

What are the benefits and risks of obstructive sleep apnea surgery?

Significant benefits. The are many benefits to sleep apnea surgery. The risks and benefits depend on the surgery performed. The only procedure i currently perform for sleep apnea surgery is orthognathic surgery with maxillomandibular advancement. It has a documented 95% success rate. Other procedures like uppp have significant post op pain and poor long term outcomes with relapse. Mma surgery has minimal pain and comp. Read more...
Better health! If you are a candidate for doing so, improving your quality of life is the best benefit of the surgery. Also having less of a reliance on a machine or appliance is great as well. As for risks, it is surgery, so the inherent risks of doing so apply. Speak with your sleep specialist to determine if you are a candidate and they may be able to refer you to a surgeon for more info about your case. Read more...
The surgery. Is not very effective, CPAP is. Read more...
Benefits/risks. Benefits: Improvement in OSA symptoms. Risks: Described well here: https://www.sleepassociation.org/patients-general-public/sleep-apnea/sleep-apnea-surgery/ Read more...

Hi, I have obstructive sleep apnea, is there any risk factors having surgery (going under general anaesthetic)?

You just said it. The risks of surgery and the risk of flying in an aircraft are very similar in terms the most critical periods of time. Going under and coming back is the time when most complications occur in surgery. Taking off and landing are the most dangerous periods when flying. Make sure your surgeon AND anesthesiologist are clearly aware of any ALLERGIES or respiratory problems you may have. Good luck. Read more...
As the comment. States, it's not a problem during the general anesthetic, the anesthesiologist will be monitoring you and can easily deal with any problems. But after the surgery if taking narcotic pain meds or sedation your sleep apnea will get worse and you will not be monitored as carefully. Suggest having respiratory therapy evaluate for CPAP or continue CPAP you might be using at home. Read more...
Yes. Having OSA can put you at a higher risk of respiratory complications during surgery. It is important to let your anesthesiologist know that you have OSA so that they will take the appropriate precautions to monitor you during surgery and may arrange for therapy in the PACU. Read more...
Yes. Ask. Of course. Many different types of surgery so many types of risks. Go over in detail with surgeon. Read more...

What surgery treats sleep apnea?

Many different types. The surgery depends on where the anatomical problem is. If the only problem is extremely large tonsils then tonsillectomy can be curative. More often it is a combination of airway problems including the back of the throat and the tongue. The most successful operations move the tongue forward or reduce the size of the back of the tongue opening the airway. An ENT evaluation can be helpful. Read more...
Different options. See a sleep medicine specialist first for a proper evaluation and sleep study. For mild or moderate sleep apnea, a CPAP or bipap machine at home may be enough. In severe cases, surgery may be indicated, and there are several options that an ENT doctor can discuss. First you need to know the extent of the sleep apnea, then you can explore what treatment options might be best for you. Read more...
Many. Many. The surgical solution is targeted on the source of blockage. Nasal, throat, tongue, small jaw. Get a surgical opinion from both ENT and oral & maxillofacial surgeons. Read more...

What to do if I have the surgery to treat sleep apnea?

Post op. Hello. Rest, fluids and follow your doctors recommendations. Your sleep apnea will improve and hopefully a cure will follow. Good Luck. Read more...
Follow instructions. Follow written post-op surgical instructions. Will vary based on type of surgery. Read more...

Is sleep apnea surgery effective?

Sleep apnea. Some surgeries are more effective than others. Te most important part is the diagnosis to see where the problem is. Jaw advancement is shown to have great results. This surgery opens up the posterior airway. Read more...
It can be. Especially if you have nasal obstructions or large tonsils or adenoids. Having an open nasal airway is very important to proper breathing. Soft palate surgery is also done, but has more varied effectiveness. Each individual patient needs their own diagnosis. Read more...
It can be. Sleep apnea has two forms...'obstructive' and 'central'. The obstructive type has to do with tissues blocking the airway during sleep. Surgical reduction of these tissues can be beneficial. Don't use surgery as a primary therapy...Try non-surgical approaches first. Read more...
Sleep. Usually sleep apnea surgery involves multiple steps or procedures. The efficacy rate is less than 40% and complication rate is high. Read more...
Last resort. Whatever type of surgery, I would exhaust all other options first to see if your sleep apnea can be managed. CPAP and mouthpieces are viable options normally, but correcting a deviated septum or surgery in the throat area do help under certain circumstances. Health style changes also help- loss of weight, etc. Read more...
Often. Often very effective. Usually reserved for CPAP failures or intolerance. Sleep MD can discuss this in your case. Read more...

What is the best surgery option for sleep apnea?

MMA. Typically surgical treatment should be the last option. An oral appliance or CPAP is usually the best option. The mma - maxillary (upper) jaw and mandibular (lower) jaw advancement is often the best surgical option. Read more...
Apnea surgery. The best surgical option is to have both the upper and lower jaws positioned moore forward. Studies have shown that the predictors of success are; lower body weight, younger age, and a low ahi. With this criteria, mu opinion is that surgery should be the last option. Read more...
Last resort. Whatever type of surgery, I would exhaust all other options first to see if your sleep apnea can be managed. CPAP and mouthpieces are viable options normally, but correcting a deviated septum or surgery in the throat area do help under certain circumstances. Health style changes also help- loss of weight, etc. Read more...
Depends. Depends on the anatomy of your obstruction. Highest success rate is with jaw advancement surgery. Your anatomy has to be conducive to this procedure. Done by an oral surgeon. Read more...