What is mesenteric ischemia?

Intestinal angina. Mesenteric ischemia occurs when the blood supply to the intestine is insufficient to maintain it's normal function. When acute, it may lead to infarction of the intestine, which is life-threatening. When chronic, it may cause a nagging intense pain after eating, analogous to angina.
Artery disease. Mesenteric ischemia is an arterial disease analagous to coronary artery disease causing cardiac ischemia. In this case the arteries supplying blood to the intestines are narrowed or diseased and have blockages impeding the supply of blood (and oxygen) to the intestinal tissues.
Artery flow blockage. A person with some blockage in his coronary (heart) arteries gets angina (chest pain from the heart). A person who has blockage in his leg arteries will get leg pains (claudication) when walking. Mesenteric ischemia occurs when a person who has blockage in his mesenteric artery (flows to the intestines) does not supply enough blood to his intestines and suffers abdominal pains.
Mesenteric ischemia? This is 'insufficient blood supply' to you intestines. It can be long-term (chronic) causing pain and many other symptoms or acute (sudden) and fatal... Please seek attention.

Related Questions

What is mesenteric ischemia and want causes it?

Bowel ischaemia. Inadequate blood supply to bowel. Causes - emboli phenomenon - mesenteric artery thrombosis - hypotension - drugs e.g. Vasopressors, ergotamines, coccaine and digitalis - mesenteric venous thrombosis.

Should someone with mesenteric ischemia follow a specific diet?

Limit calories/ fat. Control calories: eat quality fat eat the right amount of fats, carbohydrates and protein avoid fad diets: eat a well-rounded diet instead. Eat small, frequent meals. Avoid large and heavy meals. Limit cholesterol in diet: limit iron intake: eat enough dietary fiber: whole grains are best. Eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetable. Reduce salt.

What is the best way to diagnose chronic mesenteric ischemia? What are solutions for someone diagnosed?

Imaging. Mesenteric imaging, Ultrasound, MRangio or standard angiography can make this diagnosis. Clinically patients with mesenteric ischemia are thin, avoid food as it causes pain, have bruit over abdomen. Once diagnosed, stents can be very helpful to treat. Open surgery is occasionally needed to increase blood supply to bowel. Avoiding bowel ischemia is essential. Ischemic bowel has HIGH mortality.

What dietary changes are recommended for someone with mesenteric ischemia?

Limit calories/ fat. Control calories: eat quality fat eat the right amount of fats, carbohydrates and protein avoid fad diets: eat a well-rounded diet instead. Eat small, frequent meals. Avoid large and heavy meals. Limit cholesterol in diet: limit iron intake: eat enough dietary fiber: whole grains are best. Eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetable. Reduce salt.

Can chronic mesenteric ischemia cause pancreatic insuffiency?

It depends. This usually causes infarction of the bowel more than anything else, but if a artery supplying the pancreas is involved, it might cause insufficiency indirectly, along with probable pancreatitis.
No. Chronic mesenteric ischemia (cmi) occurs because of poor blood flow to the intestines, classically needing 2 out of 3 blood vessels to the gut with a significant narrowing. The usual symptoms of cmi are abdominal pain after meals, unintended weight loss, and a "fear of eating." the pancreas has such a rich blood supply that poor blood flow to it is not usually a problem.

What healthy diet foods would be for someone with mesenteric ischemia?

Low fat diet. Mesenteric ischemia is typically caused by atherosclerosis of arteries supplying blood to the intestines. A low fat diet may help prevent progression of atherosclerosis. Small meals may make it less likely you will get ischemia and pain with eating.

What is a healthy diet for someone with mesenteric ischemia? What is easiest to digest?

Complex. Mesenteric ischemia is a blood supply problem with the interstinal tract. It indicates blockages in the arteries that supply blood to the small and large intestine. It is often found in people with heart disease with coronary artery disease. The best diet is low fat, low sodium with mostly vegetables, fruits, and legumes with small amounts of beef, and minimal fried foods.

My aunt has mesenteric ischemia, she can not have any procedures done to fix cause of her age 93 her doctor said. She always has pain, what can I do?

Love her. Cherish the time that the two of you have left. Her physicians can recommend diet; if the cause is atherosclerosis, close management of her lipid levels could possibly reverse the lesions some. Thanks for writing. She must be very special to you for you to have taken the time to write strangers.
Palliation. There are a variety of minimally invasive procedures (angioplasy and stenting) for certain types of mesenteric ischemia, however any procedure in a 93 year old is dangerous and needs to be viewed in terms of risk and benefit. The key is to find a physician you trust and discuss all your options.
Mesenteric Ischemia. Presumably your aunt was evaluated by a board certified vascular surgeon and determined to not be a candidate for a mesenteric reconstruction by open bypass or by angioplasty and stenting. If this is the case, then I agree with palliation being the only other option. Unfortunately not everything and not everyone can be fixed.

My 93 yr aunt has mesenteric ischemia, 2 of her valves are 100% closed, the 3rd 50%. How long till it closes all the way? Been to ER twice this week.

No way to predict. I think you mean that 2 of the three blood vessels supplying the gut are closed. If the last vessel, presumably the superior mesenteric or celiac has a 50% blockage, she could benefit from angioplasty and stenting of the vessel, since she is very symptomatic. Difficult problem this, considering her age, and a candid discussion with her doctors may help you get a better handle on options/prognosis.
Not very long. Unpredictable. However it long time survival is not likely due to age and extensive disease.