What is the definition or description of: normal pressure hydrocephalus?

Spinal fluid dysfnct. Spinal fluid circulated in and out of brain ventricles, and when there is an obstruction, intracranial pressure can increase, but the normal pressure process is one where the fluid mechanisms do not cause pressure. Symptoms involve dementia, a peculiar gait, (apraxia), urinary incontinence, and may respond to shunting. May be a sequela from prior hemorrhage or infection.
NPH. Normal pressure hydrocephalus (nph) affects nearly 500, 000 people in the U.S. As its name implies, the pressure the brain "feels" is normal. Ct scans or MRI scans show dilation of the cerebral ventricles. The classic symptoms are memory problems, trouble with walking, and urinary incontinence and frequency. This typically affects patients> 55years in age. It is very treatable with a vp shunt.

Related Questions

What causes normal pressure hydrocephalus?

Normal Pressure hydr. The source of what causes nph has not been really determined. It is a disorder that occurs more in the elderly population and is a situation where the patient has normal pressures within the brain yet has clinical symptoms of hydrocephalus or excessive water/pressure on the brain. Read more...

Normal pressure hydrocephalus: are there many symptoms?

NPH. Though the classic triad includes cognitive deficits, urinary incontinence, and gait problems, many patients do not present with all 3. Because other conditions can cause similar problems, most neurosurgeons perform additional testing prior to offering ventriculoperitoneal shunting, which is the conventional treatment of choice. Read more...

Is a prominent cistern magma dangerous in any way? Is it related to a normal pressure hydrocephalus

Not usually related. The cisterna magna is a spinal fluid space in the back of the brain which lies just posterior to the cerebellum. The space may be enlarged for a few reasons, both normal and pathologic (abnormal). You should have a MRI to evaluate further (if only CT done) and see Neurosurgeon or Neurologist for their opinion. Do you have any symptoms? Remember headaches can be from stress. Good luck. . Read more...

Has any medication been proven more effective as treatment for normal pressure hydrocephalus?

NPH Drug Treatment. No definitive evidence exists that medication can successfully treat nph. Parkinson drugs have been reported to be of benefit in anecdotal reports, these patients with nph may represent misdiagnosed cases of parkinsonism. In patients who are poor candidates for shunt surgery, repeated lumbar punctures in combination with diuretics may be considered. Read more...
No. At this time, there is no drug that has been demonstrated to help with nph. A shunt has been demonstrated to help with the nph symptoms. In patients who concurrently have other neurodegenerative disorders like alzheimers or parkinson's, medications that help these diseases may attenuate the nph symptoms. Read more...

Will very bad dementia from normal pressure hydrocephalus improve with a shunt in 68 year old?

Yes, it should. But it depends on the chronicity of the condition and the permanent damage that the pressure might have already caused. Consult a neurologist or a neurosurgeon for specific recommendation, but it seems like it is worth a try. Read more...
NPH. It really depends on how long the hydrocephalus was causing symptoms and whether there are any other medical issues that may be contributing. Dementia and other symptoms from nph is due to pressure on the brain structures from the increased fluid in the ventricles. If the hydrocephalus is treated soon enough, cognitive symptoms from the "squished" tissue may resolve partly or entirely. Read more...

I have normal pressure hydrocephalus, had surgery back in November of 2015 I do not have a shunt I wanted to know if it was safe for me to fly?

Confirm therapy. How was the diagnosis of NPH confirmed, particularly if no shunt was put in place? It would be best to understand the workup and treatment; while there haven't been specific recommendations made about normal pressure hydrocephalus and flying (commercial airlines use a peak altitude pressurized to 8000 feet) need more details; discussion with your neurosurgeon/neurologist would be important. Read more...

What symptoms would an adult with hydrocephalus have? Not talking about normal pressure hydrocephalus.

Headache. blurred or double vision, sunsetting of the eyes, problems with balance, poor coordination, gait disturbance, urinary incontinence, slowing or loss of skills, lethargy, drowsiness, irritability, or other changes in personality or cognition including memory loss. Read more...

Normal pressure hydrocephalus with high blood pressure and type 2 diabetic what sort of diet would help?

Book recommendation. You might find a book called "the blood sugar solution" by mark hyman, md helpful. He looks at the situation holistically and offers practical advice. The very best to you. Read more...

I fell down some stairs and now have venticular dilation, etiology includes hydrocephalus or normal pressure hydrocephalus. I am dizzy unstable have memory loss and incontinant how long will this last. I also have ongoing headaches, how long will these

This . This is absolutely not normal. I would be concerned about obstructive hydrocephalus. The ventricles contain fluid. This fluid is constantly being produced then tracks through the ventricle system to eventually be absorbed into the venous (veins) circulation. If you have a blockage in the track the fluid backs up causing swelling (dilation) of the ventricles. The symptoms you describe are consistent with the pressure build up in these ventricles. I would advise a repeat ct of the brain and consult with neurosurgeon sooner than later. If a blockage is present, the surgeon can place a shunt redirecting the flow of the fluid. I hope this helps. Read more...
Possibly. Normal pressure hydrocephalus (nph) is usually not associated with headaches although it is associated with the gait, memory, and bladder problems. You may also have post-traumatic hydrocephalus from your fall. This should be worked up further by a neurologist/neurosurgeon. Further scans with an MRI can determine if there is a blockage or obstruction leading to the hydrocephalus. Read more...