What causes birth defects of the heart?

Several factors. The heart develops rather early so medication exposure in the first trimester can sometimes cause heart problems. Chromosomal or genetic issues also can cause heart problems, .
Missinformation. Heart defects occur sporadically and may reflect genetic,chromosomal, or toxic effects.Inheritance risk runs about 4% for any defect if one parent has one. There are some inherited syndromes that may have a heart defect where risk is up to 50%..Toxic effects (fetal alcohol) depends on timing and amount.Kids with abnormal chromosomes will often have a heart defect.
Folic acid deficient. Folic acid deficieny can cause fetal heart defects! multiple genetic, drug, medical and environmental factors can predispose to fetal heart defects.

Related Questions

What are the causes of heart birth defects?

Cells getting lost. It's a nonspecific question you asked, but most "congenital heart defects" are caused by the cells failing to go where they're supposed to as the heart is developing. That's why the majority of these problems require surgical correction; because something just isn't in the right place. Read more...
Genes, environ, luck. A mix of genetics, exposure & chance. The formation of the heart is a very complex process as a simple vascular tube transforms into a specialized pump intertwining 2 separate circulations. Sometimes cells fail to migrate or grow-->may lead to septal defects. Structures may not form, and if they interfere with bloodflow (e.g., valve not opening), then downstream structures don't grow or develop. Read more...

Are heart birth defects cause for major concern?

Yes. Some more than others. Vsd, a type of "hole in the heart", sometimes closes on its own, while others may be life-threatening within minutes of birth. Read more...
Yes. Sometimes heart defects are causes for major concern, especially if the baby has trouble breathing or turns blue. If your baby has symptoms, doctors will evaluate your baby's heart with a chest xray, ekg, and echocardiogram. If a serious defect is found, the baby may need medicine or surgery. Many times, though, small defects or holes are found that don't affect your baby or child very much. Read more...

Is it true that raising your heart rate over 140bpm when in early stages of pregnancy/pregnancy cause birth defects due to decreased blood to fetus?

No. That used to be a misnomer, but has since been proved false. Recent studies and statements by the american college of ob/gyn have stated that women in otherwise good health can and should get their heart rates elevated in pregnancy through moderate exercise. The key is to stay super hydrated. Exercise is great in pregnancy. Read more...

How many different heart birth defects are there?

Several. There are several types of heart defects, but doctors usually classify them into several broad categories. Cyanotic defects cause your baby to turn cyanotic, or blue. Obstructive defects block the normal flow of blood through the heart and its associated blood vessels. Septal defects cause "holes" between the heart's chambers. And hypoplastic defects make one side of the heart smaller. Read more...
Many. There are heart defects that involve the connecting blood vessels in intrauterine life. There are defects involving the valves of the heart and incomplete closure of the walls between the chambers, in addition to any combination of the above. There are also conditions where the chambers fail to form properly. Read more...

How frequently does the hole in heart birth defect occur?

2-5/1000 births. The VSD (hole between lower chambers) is the most common reported heart defect.It occurs as an isolated event or along with other defects. The majority close in early infancy and are not clinically significant. Read more...

What is the likelihood of hole in heart birth defect occur?

Depends. It depends on the size, the type, and what methods are used to look for it. Broadly, atrial septal defect occurs in 1 in 1500 live births. Patent foramen ovale is extremely common and present in 10-20% of all adults but not significant. Read more...

Are heart murmurs classified as birth defects?

No. Murmurs that are not caused by an abnormality are common. They are called "functional murmurs", and are of no concern whatsoever. Read more...
No. Not every heart murmur is associated with a heart defect. Most murmurs are "flow" murmurs, the sound of the blood rushing through the heart or blood vessels. But some indicate a serious problem with the way the heart is formed. If your baby's doctor hears a murmur, she might do a chest xray or echocardiogram. She will tell you whether it could be serious and whether it needs treatment. Read more...
No. A murmur is a type of heart sound the doctor can hear with a stethoscope. Whether nor not a murmur is a birth defect depends on the cause of the sound. If the sound is caused by incorrectly formed arteries, veins, or heart parts, then the problem is a birth defect. On the other hand, many normal children have murmurs but no defects (the murmurs are probably just from the flow of the blood). Read more...
No. The murmur is but a sound. Certain murmurs are characteristic of certain defects, watch: http://www.Youtube.Com/watch?V=uh5u845zz2k. Read more...
Yes. This is true only if the murmer comes from an anatomical defect or immaturity of the heart structure. Blood does make noise as it flows through the heart normally and if heard is an innocent murmer which is harmless.In addition, murmers can occur if the heart is damaged such as from an infection-rheumatic fever for example. Read more...
No. There are many heart murmurs that are not malformations of the heart - these are called functional or benign heart murmurs, and usually represent turbulent flow of blood in the heart. Structural heart murmurs are the result of a birth defect that has caused an altered anatomy to the heart. Check with your provider if you have questions about which murmur your child has. Read more...
No. Most heart murmurs are simply noisy flow of an active blood stream, like water in a river after a rain. Pregnant women and rapidly growing kids make blood in large volumes, sometimes more than the blood vessels are used to, so the flow gets noisy. However, sometimes the noise is because there is something wrong or in the way. Ask your doctor to clarify which is true in your, or your child's, case. Read more...
Depends. If the murmur is innocent, no. If the murmur is caused by a heart defect, yes. Read more...
Overwhelming. Are benign systolic flow murmurs...Diastolic murmurs however are not benign. Read more...
Depends. A big majority of heart murmurs in children are innocent ones (without heart defect). True pathologic murmurs are associated with heart defects, often a part of birth defects. Read more...
Murmur. A murmur is just a sound and not a diagnosis; most are functional or innocent, but some can be due to heart problems, congenital or acquired. Read more...
Depends . A murmur is simply a audible sound in the heart caused by turbulence . Its a physical sign not a diagnosis. Some birth defects can cause murmurs and others wont. Murmurs can be from restricted vales, leaky valves, communications between chambers, fevers, anemia etc. So if a pt has a murmur usually an echo of the heart is done with dopplers to further evaluate it . Read more...

How do I help manage my child's heart birth defect?

Variable. Some defects like small ventriculoseptal defects close all by themselves and require no intervention, others like hypoplastic left heart require transplant. Unfortunately how you manage the defect depends upon the exact nature of the disease. Read more...
Get Good Advice. The best way to help manage a heart birth defect is to first identify the problem. Then seek advice from a qualified pediatrician or if more complicated, a pediatric cardiologist. Some heart birth defects actually disappear with age. Some are permanent, but harmless. Others require more intense therapy or even surgery.Your doctor can guide you. Read more...
Educate yourself. Because there is a wide range of heart defects, the best thing you can do to manage your child's defect is to learn as much about it as possible. Your child's pediatric cardiologist can inform you about what to look for as signs that your baby may be having more trouble and may need to see the doctor. Learn about the baby's medications, and if surgery is needed learn about it before it happens. Read more...
Develop a logbook. One of the best things one of my patients mom's did over the years was develop a log book.In it she always had detailed information about each physician involved in her daughters care.There were updated schematics of what the heart defect was, and what shunt/repairs were in place. There were med lists and when started/stopped. The other data was always quite helpful when I needed to review it. Read more...
All of the above. The answers you have received are very helpful. The specific care depends on the heart condition your child has; I would leave that to your child's cardiologist. But educating yourself and creating a log book can be especially helpful. Read more...