6 doctors weighed in:

At jiu jitsu I think I felt my shoulder slip out of place and pop back in but not bruising or swelling, was it dislocated?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Vishal Shah
Orthopedic Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: Possibly

It sounds like you experienced a partial dislocation, also known as a subluxation.
This is when the ball slides partially out of the socket but then slides back in spontaneously. It can be a one time event or lead to recurrent instability and pain. Rest and physical therapy are generally indicated. See your physician for a thorough evaluation and confirmation of the diagnosis.

In brief: Possibly

It sounds like you experienced a partial dislocation, also known as a subluxation.
This is when the ball slides partially out of the socket but then slides back in spontaneously. It can be a one time event or lead to recurrent instability and pain. Rest and physical therapy are generally indicated. See your physician for a thorough evaluation and confirmation of the diagnosis.
Dr. Vishal Shah
Dr. Vishal Shah
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Dr. James Okamoto
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Possibly

As the other docs mentioned, it may have been a "partial" dislocation/subluxation and not a complete dislocation, although in MMA and BJJ settings, some people have had so many dislocations over the yrs that they pop in and out fairly easily.
i commend you on training at 44 yrs of age! I also train, and as I get older I need to train smarter, tap quicker, and realize I'm not a youngster anymore!

In brief: Possibly

As the other docs mentioned, it may have been a "partial" dislocation/subluxation and not a complete dislocation, although in MMA and BJJ settings, some people have had so many dislocations over the yrs that they pop in and out fairly easily.
i commend you on training at 44 yrs of age! I also train, and as I get older I need to train smarter, tap quicker, and realize I'm not a youngster anymore!
Dr. James Okamoto
Dr. James Okamoto
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Dr. Thomas Deberardino
Orthopedic Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Subluxation only

You very eloquently described a shoulder subluxation, whereby the shoulder slips out of its normally reduced position to an abnormal position- usually toward the front (anterior).
A dislocation, by definition, usually requires a manual reduction by a health care provider. If the sensation recurs after adequate rest and decreased activity, see your physician for a shoulder exam and discuss options.

In brief: Subluxation only

You very eloquently described a shoulder subluxation, whereby the shoulder slips out of its normally reduced position to an abnormal position- usually toward the front (anterior).
A dislocation, by definition, usually requires a manual reduction by a health care provider. If the sensation recurs after adequate rest and decreased activity, see your physician for a shoulder exam and discuss options.
Dr. Thomas Deberardino
Dr. Thomas Deberardino
Thank
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