After total hip replacement 4 mos ago I have numbness/pain in incision area and down to the knee, what should I do?

Depends. Depending on the approach used by the surgeon the pain may be due to a cut or impinged nerve (direct anterior approach) or trochanteric bursitis (lateral, posterolateral, anterolateral approach). As the latter is more common approach, your numbness(related to the incision will diminish, and the pain will respond to therapy and steroid injection. See your doctor and explain your symptoms.
Inform surgeon. Numbness in the leg can be a complication of total hip replacement. Various nerves can be injured and cause numbness in certain areas of the leg. Inform the surgeon and he can further educate you.
Wait & See. Unless the nerve is completely cut, usuassly it is due to swelling or compression on the nerve and it commonly resolves ove time.

Related Questions

I had total hip replacement 9 18 2012 hip responding very well but my knee on the same leg is very bothersome mostly upon compression (walking) my pt?

A few possibilities. A persistent hip problem can cause referred pain to the knee on the same side. You may be more active now that your hip is improved, unmasking what was a previously a lesser problem in your knee. The hip replacement could have slightly changed the alignment of of your limb, which could cause changed loading of your knee. You should talk to the orthopaedic surgeon who replaced your hip about thi. Read more...
Total hip. Check with your orthopedic surgeon for good exam of the knee--may have sprain/strain, meniscal issues from improved hip motion & alignment after total hip replacement. Usually improves. Read more...
Knee or hip. Knee pain could be from a knee problem unrelated to the hip surgery, or it can sometimes be seen as referred pain from the hip stem causing irritation in the femur. In that instance, it is usually temporary and should gradually go away. You should see your orthopedic surgeon for an evaluation to determine the source of the pain. Read more...

I am 12 weeks off of a total hip replacement and off crutches a week now. I woke up this morning and both my ankles and legs, below my knee, were very swollen and redwith white bite like spots. Any guesses what it could be?

See doctor or go ER. This could be blood clots. You need to see your orthopedic asap or go to er. Read more...
Probably unrelated. 3 months post-op without previous problems means current symptoms likely unrelated to hip replacement. Blood clot or DVT 3 months after hip replacement is unheard of, and would not involve both legs. The fact that this rash affects both legs suggests that the hip replacement is likely unrelated. Read more...
Concerning. If you were on crutches for 11 weeks after a tha, that suggests that there may have been problems early. The swelling in both legs reflects poor venous return. You should be evaluated. Read more...

How is leg length discrepancy measured after total hip replacement? How long should one wait to evaluate?

Let me explain. Limb length discrepancy can be measured by a physician during a physical examination and through x-rays. Usually, the physician measures the level of the hips when the patient is standing barefoot. A series of measured wooden blocks may be placed under the short leg until the hips are leveled.If the physician believes a more precise measurement is needed, he or she may use x-rays. (scanogram). Read more...
Exam and x-ray. Surgeons are careful at the time of tha to equalize leg lengths. In some cases the hip will be more stable if slightly longer. Many patients will feel that the operative leg is longer the 1st month after surgery but in fact it is not. An exam and x-ray will show the true leg length and I do this at 6 weeks. Stretching exercises will resolve the feeling of it being longer. Read more...

Leg swelling after I had a total hip replacement surgery. Did they do wrong?

Not necessarily. Leg swelling is not unusual after hip replacement, however, it can also indicate more serious conditions like blood clots. Make sure you express your concerns with your surgeon so that they can examine your leg to determine if the swelling is normal or not. Read more...
Not unusual. It is very common to get leg swelling after total hip or knee replacement. Of course, swelling with pain can be a sign of DVT (deep venous thrombosis) ..Also described by some as "blood clots". This should be evaluated by your doctor. Painless swelling will often resolve after a few months. Read more...

What leg motions can be done after a total hip replacement?

HIP REPLACEMENT. I am not sure if all the movements are preserved like flexion, extension, abduction, etc. Probablly, rom is slightly diminised. Please ask the orthopedic surgeon. Read more...
It depends... Early movement restrictions are based on the surgical method used. Extreme positions need to be avoided in the first 6 weeks no matter what. If an anterior approach is used, hyperextension combined with rotating the foot outward can be a problem. If a posterior approach is used, the risky move is hip flexion (bringing hip up to chest) combined with internal rotation. Eventually, most are safe. Read more...

If a person had a total hip replacement (anterolatera), then what are stable leg motions?

Stable. These are exactly what their name implies; motions that promote a stable leg; and this is important especially after hip/joint replacement as part of the rehabilitative process. Ask the orthopedist/physical therapist for more about this. Read more...
Abduction and neutra. Usually abduction, flexion and external rotation within a range. Best to ask the surgeon his/her parameters. Read more...
Flexion type. With an anterior-type approach, the safe motions are flexion of the hip with internal rotation. Avoid hip hyperextension combined with rotation of the foot outward. Read more...